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Home > Mines, Quarries & Sites > Cannock Lodge Colliery Coal Colliery

Cannock Lodge Colliery (Norton Cannock Colliery) Coal Colliery (United Kingdom)


The 1882 ordnance survey map shows two sites. The largest at SJ 988 044, described as the no 1 pit, and a smaller site to the south at SJ 991 042 described as 5 and 6 pits. As the map shows no other sites it is to be assumed that the intermediate numbered sites had fallen into disuse by that time.
It was served by the western arm of the Wyrley and Essington canal and a branch of the LNWR railway.
The no 1 pit (downcast) was 10 feet diameter and sunk to a depth of 149 yards to “Deep Seam” with an inset at 136 yards to “Shallow Seam”. The headframe of timber was 36 feet high. No 2 (upcast) was same but 9 feet diameter.
The no 3 pit 6 feet diameter was sunk to a depth of 36 yards to the “Four foot” seam.
The mine had an underground steam powered haulage system by wire rope which ran for 800 yards underground, the rope passing down the shaft from surface, being wound by a two cylinder horizontal steam engine.
Pumping was by a 27 inch Bull Engine with a 7 foot stroke.
In 1896 the mine was sold to Norton Cannock Colliery for £6500.

Today nothing at all remains, just fields. The last vestiges were probably lost during extensive opencast working in the early 1990s.
The smaller site to the south was served by the Lord Hays branch of the eastern arm of the Wyrley and Essington canal at the Newtown basins. The Lord Hays branch of the canal started at the Fishley no 1 road bridge and later served some of the Fishley collieries. It passed under the Newtown road bridge to end at the basins.
The Lord Hays branch has now gone, as has the Newtown road bridge, probably in the early 1950s following an act of parliament relative to the filling in of old disused canals. I understand that the basins remained, at least in part, until the early 1990s when a massive opencast operation took out a lot of land west of the A34 at Newtown. The eastern arm of the canal is also gone. The Great Wyrley Junior Football club just off Long lane has a building that was originally the offices of the opencast.
Today the site is fronted by The Lakes Retirement Home; the southern colliery site is now Newtown Farm. The lakes are two in number, the largest; the “Izaak Walston Fishiery” must have been caused by mining subsidence as it’s not shown on early maps. The smaller is not natural and is part of a land drainage system put in after the opencast operation.

Photos of Cannock Lodge Colliery Coal Colliery

Historic Photographs Of Cannock Lodge Colliery
Historic Photographs Of Cannock Lodge Colliery (1 photo)
Last updated August 11th by royfellows
Photographs Of Cannock Lodge Colliery
Photographs Of Cannock Lodge Colliery (0 photos)
Last updated August 11th by royfellows

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Major Mining Region

Cannock Lodge Colliery Coal Colliery belongs to the Staffordshire region.

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