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Mine Exploration Forum

Author Paging the linguists
crickleymal

Joined: 12/03/2009
Location: Gloucester

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Posted: 08/06/2013 19:32:49
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I've just been on holiday to Cornwall and was struck by the similarity between Welsh and Cornish (I know they're both Brythonic Celtic languages). I was wondering where the Cornish word wheal derives from as it doesn't seem to be similar to the Welsh word for mine. Is it the same root as chwarel? IP: 86.170.255.165
Morlock

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Joined: 31/07/2008

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Posted: 08/06/2013 20:05:46
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"Pwll" maybe? IP: 82.26.137.223 Edited: 08/06/2013 20:06:09 by Morlock
Buckhill

Joined: 08/04/2008

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Posted: 08/06/2013 20:28:28
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Anglicised from cornish Hwel = mine. IP: 217.42.47.58
sinker

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Joined: 13/12/2010
Location: North Wales.

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Posted: 08/06/2013 20:36:26
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Buckhill wrote:

Anglicised from cornish Hwel = mine.


Agree, but always thought it was "whel", as in mine, hole in the ground (well), excavation etc etc?

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Buckhill

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Posted: 08/06/2013 20:54:47
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Also have hwel-sten = tin working. The hwel seems to translate as work and is found as a component of other phrases, chi-hwel = workshop, den-hwel = workman , etc. IP: 217.42.47.58
Tamarmole

Joined: 20/05/2009
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Posted: 08/06/2013 21:11:50
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Buckhill wrote:

Anglicised from cornish Hwel = mine.


Also rendered as "Huel".

My understanding is that Huel / Wheal is a "work", while "Bal" is the Cornish rendering of mine
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Willy Eckerslyke

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Location: Anglesey

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Posted: 08/06/2013 23:35:04
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I feel that the Welsh word 'chwarel' means 'quarry' rather than 'mine'. Mining is mwyngloddio in Welsh, which comes from mwynglawdd, but that's not a word you hear very often. You're more likely to hear 'gweithfeydd' - 'workings' - which doesn't help much with the original question. Blush IP: 146.90.166.54
Cat_Bones

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Posted: 09/06/2013 00:10:14
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I wondered whether there was a similar connection between "Cwm" in Welsh and "Coombe" as a common place name in the West Country, both meaning "valley". IP: 77.98.82.210
Peter Burgess

Joined: 01/07/2008
Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

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Posted: 09/06/2013 12:10:54
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I would be amazed if there wasn't! There are coombes in many places other than the west country.

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Roger the Cat

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Posted: 09/06/2013 13:24:59
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Yes, Webster says -
Origin of COMBE:
Middle English coumbe, cumbe, from Old English cumb, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh cwm valley
First Known Use: before 12th century
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crickleymal

Joined: 12/03/2009
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Posted: 09/06/2013 15:04:17
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sinker wrote:

Buckhill wrote:

Anglicised from cornish Hwel = mine.


Agree, but always thought it was "whel", as in mine, hole in the ground (well), excavation etc etc?


That's what my thought was, quarry = hole in the ground/excavation.
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Cat_Bones

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Posted: 09/06/2013 15:20:57
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Roger the Cat wrote:

Yes, Webster says -
Origin of COMBE:
Middle English coumbe, cumbe, from Old English cumb, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh cwm valley
First Known Use: before 12th century


Thanks for the confirmation Smile
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