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Mine Exploration Forum

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Author Post Blast Proceedure
lozz

Joined: 03/08/2012
Location: Cornwall

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Posted: 21/03/2013 14:09:25
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A good video about this.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxyBImZyFb4

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.14.100
exspelio

Joined: 02/05/2012
Location: peak district

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Posted: 21/03/2013 15:19:16
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These clips bring back memories of better times and help me realise how good my induction training manager was in the early '80's in Sallet Hole, even though he was slated by the "old hands".

--

Always remember, nature is in charge, get it wrong and it is you who suffers!.
IP: 81.153.179.152
lozz

Joined: 03/08/2012
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Posted: 21/03/2013 15:28:58
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exspelio wrote:

These clips bring back memories of better times and help me realise how good my induction training manager was in the early '80's in Sallet Hole, even though he was slated by the "old hands".


Yes, all very valid for safety, not all always adhered to.
One rule we never ever broke was never drilling in sockets or around cut off misfires.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.14.100
exspelio

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Posted: 21/03/2013 17:57:36
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Two points, good training avoids misfires and a good mining log shows which way to drill your Burns cut. Smile Smile

--

Always remember, nature is in charge, get it wrong and it is you who suffers!.
IP: 81.153.179.152
lozz

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Posted: 21/03/2013 18:24:17
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exspelio wrote:

Two points, good training avoids misfires and a good mining log shows which way to drill your Burns cut. Smile Smile


We never had any of that back then where I worked, it was a case of set up machine and start drilling but as said sockets were a no no and a good blasted face examination was a must.
With all this mine safety some were very relaxed about it, taking shortcuts etc most paid some kind of price, some with their lives. I've made a few silly mistakes but always tried to play it safe, these things are out to get you.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.14.100
exspelio

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Posted: 21/03/2013 19:30:10
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All it took was a "S" or "D" in the log, that would tell you wether the previous cut was the square or diamond.
I must admit when I was safety rep. I was frowned upon many times for insisting on good "ragging down" because the heading men were on yardage bonus and time spent on making safe reduced time on making headage.

--

Always remember, nature is in charge, get it wrong and it is you who suffers!.
IP: 81.153.179.152
John Lawson

Joined: 09/12/2010
Location: Castle Douglas Dumfries & Galloway

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Posted: 21/03/2013 19:40:11
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A very interesting video!
One wonders if this is typical in USA mines.
Where was the Company issued overalls? Or company safety spectacles or even self rescue devices?
Who would want to drill in that stope without a mask?
Perhaps having seen modern British and Irish mines our rules are more strict.
Personally the only modern drilling I have seen underground involves using a supporting mobile rig.
The practices shown here I would have thought were more typical of mining in the 1960's than the present.
IP: 109.151.177.15
lozz

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Posted: 21/03/2013 19:43:17
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exspelio wrote:

All it took was a "S" or "D" in the log, that would tell you wether the previous cut was the square or diamond.
I must admit when I was safety rep. I was frowned upon many times for insisting on good "ragging down" because the heading men were on yardage bonus and time spent on making safe reduced time on making headage.


Yes, we were on contract as well, per fathom, we used either 5 or 9 hole cuts, the center on a five hole cut was reamed as free, can't remember exactly which was the free hole(s) on a nine hole, cut would you or anyone know?
I worked with a bloke who always used to skimp on barring down, it cost him dearly in the end.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.14.100
exspelio

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Posted: 21/03/2013 20:26:16
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Yes, your 5 hole cut is the Burns cut, the centre hole ("bull hole") should be larger (about one & quarter inch) and left clear.
I think your 9 hole cut is what we called a "wedge cut", 9 holes in a square tapering in towards each other designed to blow a wedge out from the centre, I think the middle hole was left clear so the wedge broke as it went, 8 or even 6 hole wedges would do the job but they would leave you with a big lump and quite a bit of hammer work!.

--

Always remember, nature is in charge, get it wrong and it is you who suffers!.
IP: 81.153.179.152
lozz

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Posted: 21/03/2013 20:45:29
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exspelio wrote:

Yes, your 5 hole cut is the Burns cut, the centre hole ("bull hole") should be larger (about one & quarter inch) and left clear.
I think your 9 hole cut is what we called a "wedge cut", 9 holes in a square tapering in towards each other designed to blow a wedge out from the centre, I think the middle hole was left clear so the wedge broke as it went, 8 or even 6 hole wedges would do the job but they would leave you with a big lump and quite a bit of hammer work!.


Might have been a 9 hole wedge cut but I have this picture in my head that the holes were parallel to the center hole which usually had a charging stick or drill steel pushed part way in to use as a guide, as said can't remember exact though but I should do, the middle on the five was 2" plus I seem to remember, with a knock off reamer bit. Have heard the term wedge cut mentioned in the past also drag cut. Reamers weren't always used where I worked it depended on the ground and wether spacers were being used I seem to remember. Thanks for the info.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.14.100
Boy Engineer

Joined: 20/06/2008
Location: Derby

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Posted: 21/03/2013 20:48:20
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The 9 hole burn cut had parallel holes, all on equal spacing. The middle hole on each side was uncharged. IP: 2.29.253.82
exspelio

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Posted: 21/03/2013 20:58:43
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Now you've got me confused (not a hard job Confused ), How can nine holes be drilled in a parallel, equally spaced formation?

--

Always remember, nature is in charge, get it wrong and it is you who suffers!.
IP: 81.153.179.152
lozz

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Posted: 21/03/2013 21:05:14
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John Lawson wrote:

A very interesting video!
One wonders if this is typical in USA mines.
Where was the Company issued overalls? Or company safety spectacles or even self rescue devices?
Who would want to drill in that stope without a mask?
Perhaps having seen modern British and Irish mines our rules are more strict.
Personally the only modern drilling I have seen underground involves using a supporting mobile rig.
The practices shown here I would have thought were more typical of mining in the 1960's than the present.


I think you have to view it in context with the brief worded introduction at the begining of the video, the video for what it covers covers it well I thought, all that little protection kind of stuff was going on here in the Southwest past the 60's and also the 70's and into 80's big time.
I'm a safety minded bloke, but when it comes to making a living in such environments certain things can get overlooked, ear defenders were almost unheard of when I started, same for arm protectors, no body wore masks at all and self rescue devices were not much heard off except for mine rescue teams, climbing a raise was by a single chain only, but that was then, hardrock mining techniques have changed a lot since then and probably for the better.
For the explorer though that video and the raise video I posted gives an insight to how the rock can fracture during a blast, well beyond the void it creates, I think that the better the understanding an explorer has about how the stuff was mined then he/she stands a better chance of survival when exploring underground.
I do some work in the woods, logging etc, wear all the recomemded personal protection stuff and try making contract in the hieght of summer, it can't be done, everythings a trade off, 'tis up to the individual if no one elses safety is at risk.
Lozz.
IP: 86.184.14.100
Buckhill

Joined: 08/04/2008

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Posted: 21/03/2013 21:30:41
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lozz wrote:



Might have been a 9 hole wedge cut but I have this picture in my head that the holes were parallel to the center hole which usually had a charging stick or drill steel pushed part way in to use as a guide, as said can't remember exact though but I should do, the middle on the five was 2" plus I seem to remember, with a knock off reamer bit. Have heard the term wedge cut mentioned in the past also drag cut. Reamers weren't always used where I worked it depended on the ground and wether spacers were being used I seem to remember. Thanks for the info.

Lozz.


That's the way we did it - 5 holes, centre 2" & uncharged - but I preferred wedge (2 rows at bottom "V-d" all charged with parallel (to heading) easers and trimmers. Sometimes used drag cut (all holes parallel to drivage, but level at top increasing dip on each row down) - it depended on how we wanted the muck to land for filling out.
IP: 81.129.167.133
lozz

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Posted: 21/03/2013 21:49:55
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Boy Engineer wrote:

The 9 hole burn cut had parallel holes, all on equal spacing. The middle hole on each side was uncharged.


Yes, instant recall, that's the one, thanks, I seem to remember that the 9 hole wasn't reamed in our situation but the 5 hole was. The 9 holes center was a zero det. then diamond square etc. The both cuts had closely spaced holes, it was a ****** if the drill steel ran in, sweating on a twister to get them out, more often than not you coudn't and had to drill another hole and hope..

Lozz.
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scooptram

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Posted: 22/03/2013 00:03:21
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you was saying about drilling into sockets ,i was overseas working and we had contractors in drilling my god you have NEVER seen drilling and charging up like it they always used sockets (deep ones at that!) the cuts where wild any det in any hole more or less if they pulled half a round we where bloody amazed it was a good day when they buggerd off back home was just amazed no one was killed /hurt!

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IP: 86.151.188.104
lozz

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Posted: 22/03/2013 18:12:03
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scooptram wrote:

you was saying about drilling into sockets ,i was overseas working and we had contractors in drilling my god you have NEVER seen drilling and charging up like it they always used sockets (deep ones at that!) the cuts where wild any det in any hole more or less if they pulled half a round we where bloody amazed it was a good day when they buggerd off back home was just amazed no one was killed /hurt!


Yes, beggars belief, if I was still mining and my partner started to drill in a socket then I would be off, double pronto via the mine managers office, cut off holes can be another death trap we always examined a fresh blasted face very carefully. The deaths and injuries from socket drilling are well documented, no wonder you were glad to see the back of that cowboy crew.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.12.245
lozz

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Posted: 22/03/2013 18:22:12
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exspelio wrote:

Now you've got me confused (not a hard job Confused ), How can nine holes be drilled in a parallel, equally spaced formation?


Three rows of three, when we did it the holes were quite close together, I don't think the three rows of three measured more than around 14" square maybe? Center hole det. zero, it needed accurate drilling especially pulling an 8 ft round, if the drill ran in to another hole it was the end of that hole and pick up U shaped drill steel the following shift.
Charging stick or drill steel was used as a guide once center hole was drilled.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.12.245
Ty Gwyn

Joined: 30/10/2009
Location: Lampeter

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Posted: 22/03/2013 18:34:58
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lozz wrote:

The deaths and injuries from socket drilling are well documented, no wonder you were glad to see the back of that cowboy crew.

Could you explain this term Socket Drilling,not a term come across in a Colliery,

Unless you mean drilling in a crack in the rock,as the power of the charge would be lost through the crack.
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lozz

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Posted: 22/03/2013 18:48:47
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Ty Gwyn wrote:

lozz wrote:

The deaths and injuries from socket drilling are well documented, no wonder you were glad to see the back of that cowboy crew.

Could you explain this term Socket Drilling,not a term come across in a Colliery,

Unless you mean drilling in a crack in the rock,as the power of the charge would be lost through the crack.


Hi, we termed a socket as the back of a blast hole that didn't break out clean at the back, if it was a socket less than the length of the primer then the chances were that there would be no unexploded stuff in it, nevertheless even a very shallow socket was a no no as were all sockets. If the socket was deep as sometimes was the case in the back corner holes then there might be explosives still in there even if the primer as fired I remember the granite durng the blast could physically reform itself over part of the cut off hole so it would be hard to distinguish between the natural granite face and a hole that has been cut off, hope I have explained this ok, any part of the round that didn't break clean out was treated with suspicion.

Lozz.
IP: 86.184.12.245
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