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Author Mining term: Manchester Gate
Hayman

Joined: 29/03/2012

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 29/03/2012 22:09:24
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The Ball Clay Mine Museum at Norden on the Isle of Purbeck has a Manchester Gate on the inclined two foot gauge track it has built as a part of a reconstruction of what a ball clay mine would have looked like.

A short stretch of horizontal tunnel, using authentic iron hoops recovered from actual Isle of Purbeck workings, leads to a (possibly one in ten gradient) rope-hauled incline to the above-ground stage where the clay would have been tipped from the two-foot gauge mine trucks into either road transport or larger gauge wagons to be taken to the processing plant.

The Manchester Gate is partway up the incline, and consists of a steel box section some four feet long, six inches high and two inches deep held horizontal in vertical jaws at the top of two approx 18 inches high steel stanchions, one either side of the two foot gauge rails.

Since actual mine trucks are used on the horizontal area of the above-ground stage to show how they were tipped into larger forms of transport, the gate is not just for show. It would indeed stop a runaway truck from escaping right down the incline and on further.

Other mining equipment at the site includes a miners’ lamp charging board (not working), an authentic miners’ tally board with tallies, an electric winch, various trucks and hopper wagons, a Ruston diesel loco, and a hundred yards or more of surface track.

Most incongruous is a two foot gauge steel framed wooden panelled open truck bearing the faded initials SNCV (seemingly Societé Nationale de Chemins de fer Vincinaux – Belgium’s narrow gauge, albeit metre gauge, secondary railway network) and prominently BRABANT (a town in Belgium) in black on a very modern looking plastic strip. Perhaps the truck was used in the metre gauge system’s Brabant workshops. It has exterior coil spring suspension.
IP: 31.185.198.75
scooptram

Joined: 22/05/2007

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 29/03/2012 22:27:13
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also known as a warick down here

--

mind that rock OUCH
IP: 86.139.219.101
Mr.C

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Joined: 23/03/2008
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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 00:08:44
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scooptram wrote:

also known as a warick down here

Certainly not round here, or anywhere else I've come accross. Manchester gate is as discribed above - ie horizontal. A Warwick (or drop Warwick) is just off vertical & hinged from the rings or roof bar etc. ( out of interest, these are known as Ackers in N. Staffs).
BTW there's some nice Manchester Gates in Maenofferen.

--

If things dunner change - the'll stop as the' are.
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scooptram

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 01:06:23
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opps misread the post Oh My God

--

mind that rock OUCH
IP: 86.139.219.101
Ty Gwyn

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 01:13:43
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Nor in South Wales,a Manchester gate,is a gate across the road.

A Warick is a post or rail placed in the middle of the road,in Smallmines,the NCB had a kind of balanced Warick.
IP: 86.142.190.50
derrickman

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 10:16:17
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there is another variant of the Warwick gate sometimes seen in segmental tunnels, where there is room under the tracks and the available diameter is wide at track level relative to the tracks.

This takes the form of a counterweight below the track, and a hinged bar which swings up between the rails - like a "drop warwick" but the other way up, as it were. I've seen these on London Underground escalator shafts, where the diameter is typically between 7.5m to 9m, and there are pedestrian stairs and possibly rails for a working stage either side of the track.


--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change .... oh, I don't know, I've still got a lamp like that.
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oildrum

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 10:54:50
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Mr.C wrote:

scooptram wrote:

also known as a warick down here

Certainly not round here, or anywhere else I've come accross. Manchester gate is as discribed above - ie horizontal. A Warwick (or drop Warwick) is just off vertical & hinged from the rings or roof bar etc. ( out of interest, these are known as Ackers in N. Staffs).
BTW there's some nice Manchester Gates in Maenofferen.


Agree that Manchester gates were horizontally mounted.

As for Warwicks or Drop Warwicks they were also known as Derricks in N.Staffs too. Some were simply hinged at the top and moved out of the way manually, whilst laterly they were mounted centrally to the rails & lifted either with a rope & pulley, or via a ram system

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'where's the shearer?'
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staffordshirechina

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 11:42:53
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The other North Staffs term that comes to mind for a drop warwick was a 'pow', (said as in pow-wow). Not sure how it was spelt or even if it ever was spelt! I only ever heard it as a spoken term in small mines. IP: 95.148.25.52
Mr.C

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 11:46:10
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staffordshirechina wrote:

The other North Staffs term that comes to mind for a drop warwick was a 'pow', (said as in pow-wow). Not sure how it was spelt or even if it ever was spelt! I only ever heard it as a spoken term in small mines.

I've heard that one too. Always thought it was because it's the potteries for pole.

--

If things dunner change - the'll stop as the' are.
IP: 2.27.26.47
staffordshirechina

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 12:04:06
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You could be right! The potteries dialect seemed to get much stronger underground and being non local it was sometimes a struggle.
For example, 'Kind Slice' was some form of local authority dwelling!
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Cat_Bones

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 13:02:45
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Mr.C wrote:

BTW there's some nice Manchester Gates in Maenofferen.


Are these the barriers at the top of the main incline? Think there are others inside the mine too?
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Mr.C

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 16:36:42
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staffordshirechina wrote:

You could be right! The potteries dialect seemed to get much stronger underground and being non local it was sometimes a struggle.
For example, 'Kind Slice' was some form of local authority dwelling!

Ah theet rayt theer - war abite bay chum spiders Big Grin

--

If things dunner change - the'll stop as the' are.
IP: 2.27.26.47
Mr.C

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 16:38:28
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Cat_Bones wrote:

Mr.C wrote:

BTW there's some nice Manchester Gates in Maenofferen.


Are these the barriers at the top of the main incline? Think there are others inside the mine too?

Yes, those are the things.

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If things dunner change - the'll stop as the' are.
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Morlock

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 18:56:07
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A Warwick, presumably?







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inbye

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 19:22:04
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I've not come across the term Manchester Gate, or anything that fits the description, in NCB Yorkshire pits.
We had drop warwicks that were spaced to allow a run of tubs to pass between. They were linked with wire rope (so, pulling one down, lifted it's mate).
Another device was known as Stop Blocks. They were a heavy, iron bound timber, mounted at rail level. Rather than "stopping" a runaway, these were intended to derail. Pivoted at one end, they were "closed" across the track, with the free end coming against a fixed stop. They worked Smile
Anyone ever come across Jazz rails?...

--

Regards, John... 'Folk from Huddersfield think Sex is what coal gets delivered in...'
IP: 86.29.103.94
staffordshirechina

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 22:42:44
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Morlock, yes that is a warwick though it's pulley, cable and counterbalance have gone.
Inbye, what you describe is a Manchester gate though all the ones I have seen have been made of steel.
The last time I saw any jazz rails was at Glapwell colliery in the early 1970's!
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Ty Gwyn

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 30/03/2012 23:05:25
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What are Jazz Rails?
Is that a Midlands term for something else.
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staffordshirechina

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 31/03/2012 10:17:08
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Jazz rails are tub rails that have been laid with a sharp curving zig-zag. At normal speed, tubs just go around them. Runaways get thrown off the road.
I don't think they were reliable in the way that a warwick or gate are so they died out.
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inbye

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 31/03/2012 10:23:37
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staffordshirechina wrote:

Morlock, yes that is a warwick though it's pulley, cable and counterbalance have gone.
Inbye, what you describe is a Manchester gate though all the ones I have seen have been made of steel.
The last time I saw any jazz rails was at Glapwell colliery in the early 1970's!


Ah, right, must have misunderstood the description.

Just re-read the OP's description & it does sound different, "held in vertical jaws", &, "at the top of two 18" stanchions". That reads like the body of the tub runs into it, (well to me anyway).



--

Regards, John... 'Folk from Huddersfield think Sex is what coal gets delivered in...'
IP: 86.29.165.175 Edited: 31/03/2012 10:34:00 by inbye
inbye

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Mining term: Manchester Gate
Posted: 31/03/2012 10:36:49
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staffordshirechina wrote:

Jazz rails are tub rails that have been laid with a sharp curving zig-zag. At normal speed, tubs just go around them. Runaways get thrown off the road.
I don't think they were reliable in the way that a warwick or gate are so they died out.


Yes, a sort of lazy S shape. They also required a bit of skill to construct...

--

Regards, John... 'Folk from Huddersfield think Sex is what coal gets delivered in...'
IP: 86.29.165.175
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