Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Author What is this?
ironworks

Joined: 03/02/2012

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 03/03/2012 14:08:51
Reply |  Quote


This is a rolled castiron cylinder on the site of the old Pasture colliery at Wyke. one of the low Moor Colliery Pits. Theses closed at the end of the !9th Century . we could be looking at around 1850's. is it an old boiler?
ironworks

Tweak: image link corrected - sl
IP: 95.147.255.71 Edited: 03/03/2012 14:12:07 by (moderator)
staffordshirechina

Avatar of staffordshirechina

Joined: 15/11/2009
Location: North Staffordshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 03/03/2012 17:42:04
Reply |  Quote
If it is rolled, and it appears to be, it will certainly not be made of cast iron. IP: 95.148.27.230
sinker

Avatar of sinker

Joined: 13/12/2010
Location: North Wales.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 03/03/2012 19:46:01
Reply |  Quote
Odd....doesn't look like a boiler? Are the seperate sections bolted or welded together?

--

O'r graig, egni.
IP: 109.157.34.102
grimwald

Joined: 13/10/2008
Location: Southern Cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 03/03/2012 21:21:34
Reply |  Quote
Looks to be riveted rolled steel, does it go? could it be a shaft liner.??? Confused IP: 92.6.255.50
sinker

Avatar of sinker

Joined: 13/12/2010
Location: North Wales.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 03/03/2012 21:49:40
Reply |  Quote
grimwald wrote:

could it be a shaft liner.??? Confused


Thumbs Up That's what I thought Thumbs Up

--

O'r graig, egni.
IP: 86.148.216.122
rikj

Avatar of rikj

Joined: 27/12/2008

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 03/03/2012 23:06:56
Reply |  Quote
It's an air shaft, though I took the question to be what was used to make it.

Is this a normal type of shaft liner anywhere? I've got vague memories of metal tubbing being used where there was a lot of water ingress in a shaft.

It's unlikely that it's been left unfilled, but if it had, probably not the sort of place you'd want to visit! The haulage ways would have been high enough for tubs, but the seams would probably only have been 10-30 inches high. That was why children were used.


--

sanitas per evolo
IP: 109.151.77.33
4737carlin

Avatar of 4737carlin

Joined: 16/05/2011
Location: New Brighton

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 03:45:43
Reply |  Quote
Is that tree growing out of it?? not behind it? IP: 94.192.172.154
staffordshirechina

Avatar of staffordshirechina

Joined: 15/11/2009
Location: North Staffordshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 09:36:08
Reply |  Quote
It has been some sort of tank, maybe even a low pressure boiler.
As Carlin says, the tree is growing out of a hole in the side with a ring of bolt holes around it.
Shaft linings were never riveted together like this, they were usually made of cast iron sections and bolted together, just as modern concrete sections are.
It may not be anything to do with a shaft, just an old tank reared up on end!
IP: 95.148.24.115
ironworks

Joined: 03/02/2012

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 10:05:55
Reply |  Quote
Thanks for all the comments. I will supply more information
The site of this cylinder was an old colliery and stationary winding engine site for the Lowmoor Iron Company. They were world famous for their cast iron. During the late 19th century they still made cast iron by the traditional process. They never went into steel. The speciality was rolled cast iron boiler plate. I am sure this cylinder is cast iron.it is beautifully rivetted and of solid construction. The treee grows out of it.
The area abounds in brickworks and clay so it does not make sense for it to be a ventilation shaft, shaft liner or traditional chimney. it is a stand alone piece of equipment.
I wondered about the lagging cover for a vertical steam engine.
ironworks
IP: 92.22.152.185
Boy Engineer

Joined: 20/06/2008
Location: Derby

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 11:00:59
Reply |  Quote
There is an interesting account of a visit to the Ironworks here: http://www.sblha.com/ht.html
The plates in the account seemed to be produced from wrought iron, but I stand to be corrected.
IP: 2.27.199.101 Edited: 04/03/2012 15:31:20 by Boy Engineer
inbye

Avatar of inbye

Joined: 06/07/2008
Location: Huddersfield

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 15:22:47
Reply |  Quote
May be completely wide of the mark but can't see how this could be made from cast iron. The large heating boilers you see in older buildings are normally made up of sections of cast iron that are bolted together, to allow for movement when heating/cooling. Also, the fact it's riveted, cast iron & hammer blows don't get on too well together.
Anyway, a quick test to prove/disprove, would be to take a battery drill & drill a small hole in it, somewhere out of sight. If the cuttings are granular & the bit soon loses it's edge, then it's cast. If the cuttings come out twirly, it's steel.

As to the idea behind it, again could be completely wrong, if the shaft needed to be made safe but not sealed (i.e. capped) & there was an old disused boiler, air receiver, whatever on site, it would be a quick & effective solution.
Just my two-penny worth... Big Grin

--

Regards, John... 'Folk from Huddersfield think Sex is what coal gets delivered in...'
IP: 86.25.44.86
rikj

Avatar of rikj

Joined: 27/12/2008

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 15:34:14
Reply |  Quote
inbye wrote:

As to the idea behind it, again could be completely wrong, if the shaft needed to be made safe but not sealed (i.e. capped) & there was an old disused boiler, air receiver, whatever on site, it would be a quick & effective solution.
Just my two-penny worth... Big Grin


I'd go with that one. It's marked on OS maps as "Air Shaft (disused)"; possible, of course, that they have misinterpreted the feature.

Prior to that it is marked as a pumping pit, at a guess after it finished as a winding pit. So maybe to protect an open shaft at an unmanned, but functioning site?

Will try and dig out any photos later.


--

sanitas per evolo
IP: 109.151.77.33
Phil Ford

Joined: 01/05/2008
Location: Caernarfon

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 17:26:32
Reply |  Quote
Its a Lancashire Boiler. Many small mines have used them to get into good groung from the surface. The last that I saw was at Tan Llan Colliery, Treuddyn, Mold, N wales. They did an open cut down to solid ground, then they put in three Lancashire boilers end to end and back filled over them. Having done this it made a good portal to the drift mine. IP: 86.152.214.117
Graigfawr

Joined: 04/11/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 04/03/2012 22:04:37
Reply |  Quote
Lowmoor's fame and prestiege stemmed primarily from the quality of its wrought iron production. This object appears to be wrought iron or steel rather than cast. It is difficult to gauge its diameter which would go a long way to narrowing down options but a former boiler shell (Cornish or Lancashire rather than egg-ended most likely) reared up vertically for some reason seems the obvious candidate. IP: 92.26.73.50
Boggy

Avatar of Boggy

Joined: 02/09/2007
Location: manchester

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
What is this?
Posted: 05/03/2012 15:26:36
Reply |  Quote
can someone not go and put a ladder up against it and look in..if its a shaft you may see down it if its a metal bottom it might have been a water storage tank as the tree filled hole might have been a valve take off,it dose's seem to be set in a spoil heap so maybe its a reciever for the pumped mine water if the shaft is marked as a pumping shaft at some point.
the other option is its a large plant pot for a nice tree to grow in.

--

if its a hole explore it...
IP: 83.244.149.38
Safety LED Miners Caplamps Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page