Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Author Termites-ace mineral explorers
carnkie

Avatar of carnkie

Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 10/05/2011 15:09:15
Reply |  Quote
The Jwaneng diamond mine is the richest diamond mine in the world and apparently it's discovery was, to say the least, a tad unusual.

In the early 1970s a geologist discovered a single fleck of the mineral ilmenite on the surface of the kalahari desert. Ilmenite comes from kimberlite, which hosts diamonds, and the fleck revealed the richest diamond deposit in the world which is now the jwaneng mine.

The minerals were 40m down and the grain wouldn't have reached the surface but for termites. Desert termites dig deep. In hot, arid areas they build large mounds above ground to help air circulation and temperature control, and, if these need repair, the insects tunnel 30 m or more down to get the wet mud they require. Mineral prospectors often look into their diggings for telltale signs of deposits such as gold.

I've no reason to doubt the source of this captivating information but confirmation would be nice and also are there other unusual examples along these lines?

--

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.
IP: 84.13.243.24
Digit

Avatar of Digit

Joined: 29/07/2009
Location: North Wales

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 10/05/2011 15:17:44
Reply |  Quote
Archaeologists love/hate rabbits for the similar reasons. Love them uncovering previously unknown sites. Hate them for disturbing the stratification. Basically the rabbits cannot win.

--

If you keep your eyes open you may see something interesting. If you don't something interesting may find you.
IP: 81.178.3.180
ICLOK

Avatar of ICLOK

Joined: 19/02/2008
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire up North.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 10/05/2011 19:08:12
Reply |  Quote
Yeah, I was walking ome from the pub one night and I saw this crack in the rock at the side of the road... it turned out to be black pudding and I have been supplying Sainsburys ever since..... there was a vein of Black Treacle too, but that ran out at depth near Helford...

--

Beware the Frankendoodle
IP: 78.150.171.245
carnkie

Avatar of carnkie

Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 10/05/2011 19:44:34
Reply |  Quote
If that's the best you can up with I would stick with the day job............

--

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.
IP: 89.241.101.34
AR

Avatar of AR

Joined: 07/11/2007
Location: Knot far from Knotlow in the middle of the Peak District

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 10/05/2011 20:36:37
Reply |  Quote
There's the story of a lead vein being discovered in yorkshire through a pony scraping at the ground and revealing a glint of ore, I think the tale's recounted in an old NCMRS journal.

--

I sold my soul to Satan, but he brought it back and demanded a refund....
IP: 86.134.157.64
Manxman

Avatar of Manxman

Joined: 20/04/2008
Location: North Pennines

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 10/05/2011 21:37:01
Reply |  Quote
wait ....... and there's more..... back in 1831 on the Isle of Man a local inhabitant was driving his horse and cart across the moor above Foxdale when the wheel of the cart allegedly struck a rock of pure galena and broke (so his story would have us believe) thus leading to the discovery of a rich vein of lead below the surface on the Beckwith lode. In all 13 separate mines running west to east were discovered and worked until 1879 when problems with flooding caused the mines to close.

Beat that.
IP: 91.125.46.56
Minegeo

Avatar of Minegeo

Joined: 17/06/2008
Location: Ireland

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 11/05/2011 08:43:06
Reply |  Quote
Does this "beat that" ??

The "Welcome Stranger" was the name given to the largest alluvial gold nugget found in the world, with a calculated refined weight of 2,283 oz 6dwts 9 gr. It measured 61 cm by 31 cm and was discovered by John Deason and Richard Oates, both Cornish, at Moliagul, Victoria, Australia on 5 February 1869 about 9 miles north-west of Dunolly. Found only 7.5 centimetres below the surface, near a root of a tree on a slope leading to what was then known as Bulldog Gully alledgedly by a cart wheel hitting something metallic. Its gross weight was 3523.5 troy ounces, the trimmed weight was 2520 troy ounces, and net it weighed 2315.5 troy ounces or 72.02 kg. The goldfields warden F. K. Orme reported 2268 ounces 10 dwt 14 grains (70.5591 kg) of smelted gold obtained from it (97.9% of the total weight), irrespective of scraps that were given away by the finders, estimated as totalling another 47 ounces 7 dwt.

Now beat that !!!!

IP: 109.79.24.29 Edited: 11/05/2011 12:40:58 by Minegeo
derrickman

Avatar of derrickman

Joined: 18/02/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 11/05/2011 08:56:33
Reply |  Quote
the Brent oil field has a story of that nature attached to it.

The original prospecting programme did not produce payable results ( although it DID discover oil, contrary to oilpatch legend - it just wasn't payable by then-current standards ).

The operating company chose to exercise an option to drill in a corner of the concession area not so far covered. Again, legend out-runs history because this was a contingency plan which would have followed as a matter of course in the event of sufficient results in the first round of drilling.

The results were sufficiently promising to produce a re-assessment of previous results, justify more exploration and the rest is well-known.

So, the story that Brent was only found by accident is somewhat less than entirely true, but it's quite true that the operator changed their perceptions radically following a low-confidence peripheral exercise which was carried out in large part because the fixed costs ( rig hire, lease fees etc ) were such that the costs of actually drilling, as opposed to doing nothing, were sufficiently close, the resources were available and there was a sufficient time-slot available. There's no particular reason to believe they would have returned to carry out that operation.




--

He knew the magic monotony of existence between sky and water: the criticism of men, the exactions of the sea, the prosaic severity of the daily task, because there is nothing more enticing, disenchanting, and enslaving than the life at sea.
IP: 86.30.241.199
carnkie

Avatar of carnkie

Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 12/05/2011 07:27:43
Reply |  Quote
In the spring of 1856, Caleb E. Irvine and a trading party camped along what became known as Town Gulch, later renamed Dublin Gulch. Nearby, they found a "trench" which had been dug into exposed quartz on the soon-to-be-famous Original Lode. Elk antlers found lying nearby had evidently been used as gads to dig the hole. Whether this excavation was the work of Indians or of wandering whites remains an unanswerable question; but few ever doubted Irvine's story, as he lived in Butte for many years and enjoyed a solid reputation. The Irvine party had little time to explore further, for an approaching band of Blackfeet Indians forced them to beat a hasty retreat.

Although nothing immediately became of this find from little acorns etc. Not long after Butte was to become the greatest mining district in the world.


--

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.
IP: 89.241.97.75
ICLOK

Avatar of ICLOK

Joined: 19/02/2008
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire up North.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 12/05/2011 10:29:50
Reply |  Quote
http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/geo422/butte.pdf

--

Beware the Frankendoodle
IP: 78.150.150.97
carnkie

Avatar of carnkie

Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 12/05/2011 11:27:25
Reply |  Quote
I find the history of Montana, and Butte in particular, quite interesting and have a few books on the subject.

Michael Punke, Fire and Brimstone; The North Butte Mining Disaster of 1917. ISBN 978-1-4013-0889-6

Michael P. Malone, Richard B. Roeder, William L. Lang, Montana-A History of Two Centuries, ISBN 978-0-295-97129-2

Michael P. Malone, The Battle for Butte-Mining and Politics on the Norther Frontier, 1864-1906 ISBN 0-295-98607-7

--

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.
IP: 92.28.218.181
spitfire

Avatar of spitfire

Joined: 22/04/2008
Location: Camborne

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 12/05/2011 13:19:08
Reply |  Quote
carnkie wrote:

The Jwaneng diamond mine is the richest diamond mine in the world and apparently it's discovery was, to say the least, a tad unusual.

In the early 1970s a geologist discovered a single fleck of the mineral ilmenite on the surface of the kalahari desert. Ilmenite comes from kimberlite, which hosts diamonds, and the fleck revealed the richest diamond deposit in the world which is now the jwaneng mine.

The minerals were 40m down and the grain wouldn't have reached the surface but for termites. Desert termites dig deep. In hot, arid areas they build large mounds above ground to help air circulation and temperature control, and, if these need repair, the insects tunnel 30 m or more down to get the wet mud they require. Mineral prospectors often look into their diggings for telltale signs of deposits such as gold.

I've no reason to doubt the source of this captivating information but confirmation would be nice and also are there other unusual examples along these lines?

I would have thought you were a New Scientist man
You can't fool all of the people all of the time

--

spitfire
IP: 86.175.127.180
carnkie

Avatar of carnkie

Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 12/05/2011 17:14:30
Reply |  Quote
spitfire wrote:


I would have thought you were a New Scientist man
You can't fool all of the people all of the time


Not really, I'm more of a Scientific American and The Northern Miner reader. Fascinating subject “geozoology,”

[web link]


--

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.
IP: 92.28.218.181
Roy Morton

Avatar of Roy Morton

Joined: 09/10/2007
Location: Redruth Cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 14/05/2011 02:03:00
Reply |  Quote
ICLOK wrote:

Yeah, I was walking ome from the pub one night and I saw this crack in the rock at the side of the road... it turned out to be black pudding and I have been supplying Sainsburys ever since...


Aye! but were the white bits black too? Laugh

--

'Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear'
IP: 109.156.228.84
ICLOK

Avatar of ICLOK

Joined: 19/02/2008
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire up North.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Termites-ace mineral explorers
Posted: 14/05/2011 19:51:25
Reply |  Quote
Nice ..... NOT Laugh But at least they were my own.... Blink

--

Beware the Frankendoodle
IP: 78.150.168.88
Safety LED Miners Caplamps Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page