Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Author Mozeley shaking tables
trezise

Joined: 13/07/2009
Location: Hayle, Cornwall.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mozeley shaking tables
Posted: 13/07/2009 19:09:39
Reply |  Quote
I am researching a project that my now deceased father Clifford Trezise worked on at Geevor Tin Mine.
I have very little info. on the subject, but understand that my father built for Mr. Mozeley, at Geevor in the 1970's, the prototype which appeared in the National Geographic Magazine.
On a recent visit to Geevor, the guide informed me that the tables in question were something to do with the 'Slimes'(?), a place not yet open to the public.
My father worked in the 'Fitting Shop' of Geevor for 27 years until his death in 1982.
I would be really grateful for any information on this project.
Sorry for the sketchy info.!!

IP: 86.31.47.139
xanthate

Joined: 15/03/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mozeley shaking tables
Posted: 11/02/2011 07:15:06
Reply |  Quote
Yes I knew & worked with your father. (In the bottom fitting shop at Geevor)
He built the first experimental frame with dexion (industrial mecano set). I was just a student in those days.
It was at the very bottom of "Wembley" (the slimes plant).
Was used to extract the very fine low grade tin........worked very well.
Richard Mozeley & Dr. Birch(Bristol Uni) were involved with this project.
Richard Mozeley latter coppied this in the form of a 40 deck version.
IP: 122.57.109.45
Bill L

Joined: 14/05/2009
Location: Pendeen,Cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mozeley shaking tables
Posted: 11/02/2011 11:00:05
Reply |  Quote
Geevor has a large archive of company papers which would certainly have information about the tables etc. in question: curatorial staff can help here. We also have one member of staff who worked on the project. We are happy to give access to 'Wembley' to interested individuals by prior arrangement.
Pm me if more details are needed.
IP: 93.97.216.123
xanthate

Joined: 15/03/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mozeley shaking tables
Posted: 12/02/2011 20:12:32
Reply |  Quote
The place where the experimental Mozeley fram was built, is I believe where the the on stream analiser computer was later situated.

There were still a number of the 40 deck Mozeley frames still installed in Wembley (where previously there were concrete decked round frames......another story).

On the occasion of the site visit to Geevor for the international tin congress, the pnuematics to operate the experimental frame had not arrived.
Clifford & myself rigged up battens wired to the frame with empty paint tins on the end & arranged for water to drip into the paint tins. When heavy enough these would cause the frame to tilt over to wash off the collected tin concentrate.
The paint tin caught on a stick which tilted / emptied the paint tin & the frame tilted back into its run position. (Cycle time being adjusted by the rate of the water drip).
The frame worked like this & produced I recall a 8% concentrate.
But because the then chief engineer (Mr. Bonds) was a bit of a snob, he decreed that this lash up had to be removed forthwith, even though it was working OK. Such distinguished visitors could not possibly be exposed to heath robinson things such as paint tins & water drips!!

Later there was much experimentation with speed of occilation, amplitute of occilation & cycle time between run / tilt & wash-off / Tilt back & run. Which resulted in the 40 deck Mozeley frame.

But all of this started off with Clifford Trezise swirling slimes around in an up-turned dustbin lid.

Just like Geevor had a hydro cyclone with adjustable position vortex finder years before it was copied & developed as a comercial entity.
In those days Geevor was in many ways a hot bed of technical inovation.

I have a picture of Dick Harvey & Clifford Trezise sitting on the bench in the bottom fitting shop (but not sure how to post it on here)
IP: 122.57.109.45
xanthate

Joined: 15/03/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mozeley shaking tables
Posted: 12/02/2011 21:20:24
Reply |  Quote
Further information:
The dustbin lid experiment took place after a conversation with Clifford Trezise regarding the Cornish "Rag" frame & Cornish "Round frames".

Actualy the Cornish round frame is (similar in principle) to a continuosly operating rag frame, & in many ways the Mozeley frame is in reality a multi decked rag frame but with a slight orbital motion (as used when using the Cornish vanning shovel)

Just as the frue vanner is also a variant of the rag frame, many of the fine partical / gravity concentration equipment works on similar principles. The key to the efficient operation is with the classification of the feed material to them.

Many typs of classifier have been used, but hydrualic classifiers such as the Cornish classifier, or the German Spitzcasten (I may have spelt this wrong) or the more modern R.O.Stokes Hydrosizer with multiple spigots operated be either pressure differenced in fluidised beds or by a series of mechanical cams as with the Jones hydrosizer (one of which being supplied to Red Caves who were treating the Devon great consols dumps for tin in the 1970's) gave excelent classification. Ensuring that particals in a thin film of water on the decks of the various devices had similar hydraulic properties, & gravity would do its work seperating the heavy mineralised particals from the lighter gangue or tails.

With the early Mozeley frames, to change amplitude of occilation, a weight was moved in or out on a rotating arm, with its bearings in the very centre of the frame while frequency of occilation was changed by changing pulley sizes, later varriable speed motors were used. The whole frame being susspended on wires from a static frame. and able to pivot (force being applied by a pnuematic cylinder).

In practice, one the frame had been set up, it was left alone gently occilating & tilting over to wash off the concentrate at regular intervals.
When operating a group of frames, the tilt times were staggered, to give a more regular rate of feed for further concentrating.
IP: 122.57.109.45
Bill L

Joined: 14/05/2009
Location: Pendeen,Cornwall

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mozeley shaking tables
Posted: 12/02/2011 21:25:06
Reply |  Quote
Fascinating stuff!
Do you remember David Wright - Mine Chemist - who is still at Geevor? Come in and see us sometime.
IP: 93.97.216.123
Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page