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Mine Exploration Forum

Author Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 13:22:17
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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes have long been a contentious issue in Cornwall, and elsewhere for that matter. People tend to take polarized positions on the subject and by so doing the major points are lost in the fog of prejudice. I believe I’m correct in saying that most (all) members here are in favour of leaving underground workings untouched, apart from essential maintenance, which is normally not a problem as they tend to fall outside of the remit of council policy when considering heritage status. Above ground is a different matter. I recently mentioned the renovations that the council had carried out at Brea Tin Stream Works to Allen Buckley and he nearly blew a gasket! In a small article written for the Journal of the Trevithick Society in 1994, Dr. Colin French explains that soil contamination is a wonderful asset! Rather than twitter on about this I’ve uploaded the article, “Cornwall’s Historic Tin Streams and Mine Sites Under Threat”. This was course written well before World Heritage Status was granted and his fears in that direction were unfounded.

[web link]

Just practicing Smile
IP: 88.105.216.161 Edited: 02/04/2008 13:26:08 by carnkie
AR

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Joined: 07/11/2007
Location: Knot far from Knotlow in the middle of the Peak District

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 13:35:38
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It can be quite bizarre, some of the ideas people get about old mines needing "reclaiming" - as this paper says, nature will generally do a pretty good job of recolonizing ground, even when it is loaded with what on paper look like horrendous levels of heavy metal. Not only that, but quite often what you get is an unusual ecosystem, which was one of the reasons why there was a major project here in the Peak to record and preserve these "contaminated" areas as well as the archaological and historical importance - the idea that land is derelict is very much down to who's looking at it!


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'If I had all the money I've spent on drink... I'd spend it on drink'
IP: 217.205.66.77
Gwyn

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Joined: 23/10/2007
Location: Bethesda.

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 14:41:21
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The ability to carry out a reasonable planting in a garden does not make a Landscape Designer or Gardener. Hence all the creeping, twee urbanisation. Don't get me started!
On a slightly related note, I was much impressed at how Cotoneaster cashmiriensis is invading the Dinorwic quarry complex. Who introduced this alien, invasive, weed species to the site? Is it just co-incidence that it's planted around the car park and lake walk?
IP: 172.143.49.241
carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 17:28:30
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Gwyn wrote:

Don't get me started!

Why not Gwyn; nothing like a good rant.

Fortunately around Carnkie and the Basset mines where there is quite a bit of above ground architecture little meddling has taken place. Nature is slowly taking over. It's quite interesting to compare photos of, say, the 1950s with the current landscape. Mind with the heritage status who can predict the future.........
Another problem is graded buildings. The part of the famous Bickford Smith Fuse factory that still stands at Tuckingmill is a grade 2 listed building. Or wreck depending on your point of view. Hisorically of course it's very important but should it stand in the way of re-development? Tricky question.



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IP: 88.105.144.90
Gwyn

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Joined: 23/10/2007
Location: Bethesda.

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 19:04:07
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I know what you mean, Carnkie, tricky questions.
The re-development of the Fuse factory site has the head start of the lovely stone walls, arched window reveals and occulars. That alone would cost a fortune! Find the skilled labour and the stone to build like that today! Not a big fan of sawtooth roofs or rather the created valleys which need great care and a good plumber/lead worker. Lots of opportunities for large roof lights!

On the subject matter, I've studied and partaken in reclamation and restoration on a landscape scale.
Once visited some tips associated with coal mine and power station. The tips had the best native orchid assemblage that I've ever seen. However, that Friday evening there was a TV gardening programme about native orchids which mentioned how much they cost. That weekend every orchid was dug up and stolen. All were in bloom and highly unlikely to survive.
IP: 172.143.49.241
JR

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Joined: 07/03/2008
Location: Lurking near Hereford

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 19:54:11
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At the risk of being accused of being Off Topic I'll just say this: Grade listing for buildings just says what can't be done. It doesn't say that a building can't be left to fall down by itself. That nearly happened to the north warehouse in Gloucester docks. (Yes I know docks are off topic,I'll get me coat !)

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Once I thought I knew all life's answers. Now I don't think I understand the questions.
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carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 22:38:12
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This from one of the development companies.

With its striking architecture, the former Bickford Smith fuse factory in Tuckingmill stands as a monument to the proud industrial past of Camborne, Pool, Redruth, but also serves also as a depressing symbol of the decay and lack of investment which has blighted this part of Cornwall over several decades.

Once one of the area's biggest employers, supplying safety fuses for mines, quarries and the military around the world, the factory finally closed in 1961, with the loss of 500 jobs. It signalled the start of a spiral of decline which has seen the crumbling North Lights building and the wasteland behind it lying vandalised and derelict for far too long.

[web link]
As i said before, a tricky business, But a conflict of interests.
IP: 88.105.226.98 Edited: 02/04/2008 22:40:09 by carnkie
JohnnearCfon

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Joined: 22/12/2005
Location: Sir Caernarfon

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 02/04/2008 23:56:22
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Gwyn wrote:

On a slightly related note, I was much impressed at how Cotoneaster cashmiriensis is invading the Dinorwic quarry complex. Who introduced this alien, invasive, weed species to the site? Is it just co-incidence that it's planted around the car park and lake walk?


Many of the Nantlle Valley Quarries have been over run by a member of the Cotoneaster family too. In fact the whole area (including my garden!) seems to have loads of it. Not sure if it is the same sub species as you are referring to though.

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Cadwch Cymru'n daclus-Taflwch eich ysbwriel yn LLoeger
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Gwyn

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Joined: 23/10/2007
Location: Bethesda.

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 03/04/2008 20:16:46
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John, be thankful it's not Rhododendron ponticum! IP: 172.143.49.241
JohnnearCfon

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Joined: 22/12/2005
Location: Sir Caernarfon

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 03/04/2008 21:27:01
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Funnily enough Gwyn I have three growing in pots at the moment. I am getting more from Blaenau Saturday afternoon. I like Rhodos! Got other varieties too (some already here and some I had to pay money for) at least the R. Pontiums I am being given.

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Cadwch Cymru'n daclus-Taflwch eich ysbwriel yn LLoeger
IP: 84.13.32.115
carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Derelict Land Reclamation Schemes
Posted: 04/04/2008 15:00:38
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Just to add a piece of history to the buildings shown above. In the late 17th century gunpowder was first introduced into Cornish mines. It was very expensive and at the beginning of the 19th century Cornish industrialists decided to make gunpowder themselves. The first powder mill was established in Cosawes Valley, Ponsanooth. And by the middle of the century there were several powder mills in operation.
With the advantages came the not inconsiderable disadvantage. The methods used to introduce the flame to the powder were primitive and loss of life and maiming of men and boys was an almost daily occurrence.
Along came William Bickford. He moved from Liskeard to Tuckingmill where he ran a leather business. He was appalled by the death and injuries suffered by miners and vowed to do something about it. By chance one he was visiting a man called Bray who operated a rope-making works at Tolvaddon. Whilst watching Bray walking backwards spinning some yarn Bickford had the brainwave of pouring gunpowder from a funnel into the centre of the rope as it was spun. He then, with one or two others set about producing the safety fuse that worked. They perfected the design and it was patented in 1831 and soon became the standard mining fuse in every mining field in the world.
All this in Tuckingmill village of all places so I think it is fair to say that that piece of building holds a unique place in Cornish, or for that matter, world mining history.
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