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Mine Exploration Forum

Author Tin dressing
Colin McClary

Joined: 15/12/2007
Location: St.Just

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Tin dressing
Posted: 14/12/2015 20:14:31
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For those who may be interested check out carfuryantiquarians.co.uk
IP: 95.150.88.65
lozz

Joined: 03/08/2012
Location: Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 14/12/2015 22:18:37
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Colin McClary wrote:



For those who may be interested check out carfuryantiquarians.co.uk


Thanks for that, an interesting read.

Lozz.
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Bill L

Joined: 14/05/2009
Location: Pendeen,Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 15/12/2015 18:15:31
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Re. this: anyone know what is meant by 'beam tin'? IP: 87.115.154.43
Tamarmole

Joined: 20/05/2009
Location: Tamar Valley

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Tin dressing
Posted: 15/12/2015 18:23:37
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Bill L wrote:

Re. this: anyone know what is meant by 'beam tin'?


Possibly tin from a beam work or "goffan" i.e lode tin as opposed to stream tin.

Beam (beam work) tends to be an East Cornwall /West Devon term, e.g. Chilsworthy Beam. A modern rendering is openwork.
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Bill L

Joined: 14/05/2009
Location: Pendeen,Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 15/12/2015 20:15:05
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Thanks Rick IP: 87.115.154.43
Tony Blair

Joined: 23/07/2012

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Tin dressing
Posted: 15/12/2015 23:25:22
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Bill L wrote:

Re. this: anyone know what is meant by 'beam tin'?


I wonder whether it's more specific and concerned with or similar to the ore (coarse and pure and in a clay gangue) from Great Beam mine. (Bugle-ish)
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lozz

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Location: Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 16/12/2015 07:33:29
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Chunk of wood = beam....wood tin = beam tin...wood tin-alluvial? beam tin alluvial?....just a thought.

Lozz.
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lozz

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Location: Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 16/12/2015 08:00:43
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Ref my previous post:

Being a woodsman, the species Hornbeam crossed my mind, that's wot led me to thinking about Wood Tin, so far as I know the Hornbeam was called Hornbeam after approx mid 16th century, before that it was called Horntree....anyways tree = wood, hence my Wood Tin/Beam Tin idea, I'll leave it to the experts to discuss.

Lozz.
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Roy Morton

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Joined: 09/10/2007
Location: Redruth Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 17/12/2015 01:41:50
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The celebrated writer A.L.Rowse, wrote of a character from the 15th century, who caused quite a stir amongst his contemporaries, by acting in a totally un-gentlemanly way for a knight of the realm.
The article was entitled ‘The Turbulent Career of Sir Henry de Bodrugan’
A complete and utter rogue, he appeared before parliament on numerous occasions charged with all manner of crimes including Piracy. Forget the high seas, far too dangerous, Sir Henry did it in Falmouth harbour of all places! 3 miles from his country seat.
Anyway, in Rowse’s MSS he describes one of this miscreants escapades, stealing tin from a mine circa 1473.
From the text -
Thomas Nevill complained that he had spent £100 in working a mine called the Cleker and wrought it to a depth of twelve fathoms before coming to its “proper beam, which found and the likelihood of the avail therefore being perceived by Henry Bodrugan, esquire, and Richard Bonython, gentleman,” they seized the work by force, parted the ore between them and their companions, and took £40 worth of tin stuff. Nevill petitioned parliament that he could obtain no remedy at common law, “for if any person would sue the law against the said Henry and Richard, or against any of their servants, anon they should be murdered and slain, and utterly robbed and despoiled of all their goods, so that no man dare sue, nor any man pass against the said county, whereby the said county is as lawless and like to be utterly destroyed”

The 'beam' mentioned, tallies with Rick’s post of the work being a coffan, goffan, goghan (whatever spelling you wish) openwork.
It has been suggested by at least one historian, that the Cleker referred to, could be Cligga.


--

'Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear'
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Bill L

Joined: 14/05/2009
Location: Pendeen,Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 17/12/2015 11:29:58
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Definition of a 'gentleman' seemed to have been rather loose!
Fascinating stuff, Roy - thanks!
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Tamarmole

Joined: 20/05/2009
Location: Tamar Valley

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Tin dressing
Posted: 17/12/2015 11:44:19
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A.L. Rowse's "Tudor Cornwall" is well worth seeking out. Like Hamilton Jenkin Rowse is a very readable author. IP: 86.184.130.146
Tin Miner

Joined: 24/06/2007

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Tin dressing
Posted: 17/12/2015 13:03:38
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Just an observation...

Old English writing always used an 'f' as an 's'...

So a possibility of 'goffan' reading "gossan"...

Just a thought... ouch...

Regards Tin Miner
IP: 82.46.109.51 Edited: 17/12/2015 13:04:07 by Tin Miner
Tamarmole

Joined: 20/05/2009
Location: Tamar Valley

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Tin dressing
Posted: 17/12/2015 13:36:23
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Tin Miner wrote:

Just an observation...

Old English writing always used an 'f' as an 's'...

So a possibility of 'goffan' reading "gossan"...

Just a thought... ouch...

Regards Tin Miner


Good point Chris.

Early lode tin working would have been in the gossan. This might be termed the shallow tin zone which overlies the copper zone which would have been exploited from the early eighteenth century onwards. This shallow tin zone should not be confused with the deep tin zone which typically underlies the copper and was exploited at depth from the nineteenth century.

Dolcoath is a nice example of this vertical zonation: Shallow tin, followed by deeper copper followed by deep tin.

The model does not always hold true, Devon Great Consols being the classic example. Shallow tin, followed by copper with no underlying deep tin (that we know of).
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Roy Morton

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Location: Redruth Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 17/12/2015 19:42:38
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I believe in this case the spelling in English with 'f's is probably down to Anglicisation of the original Cornish. Examples abound in place names around the county. The Cornish language was deemed too harsh for the delicate English tongue, and so things were tweaked.

--

'Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear'
IP: 81.151.57.217 Edited: 18/12/2015 00:08:09 by Roy Morton
exspelio

Joined: 02/05/2012
Location: peak district

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Tin dressing
Posted: 18/12/2015 00:47:02
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Thanks for that Roy, the original print in English could not handle the funny squiggle so they decided to knock off the left cross piece of the 'f' to make an 's', careful reading will define --

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Always remember, nature is in charge, get it wrong and it is you who suffers!.
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lozz

Joined: 03/08/2012
Location: Cornwall

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Tin dressing
Posted: 18/12/2015 07:23:26
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At a certain period in time the letter "c" woz written like an "r" as in Alire (Alice)

Lozz.
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Tin Miner

Joined: 24/06/2007

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Tin dressing
Posted: 18/12/2015 09:42:14
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There is a small booklet titled "The secretarial hand of A, B, C" which I believe can be purchased for about £5 from Record Offices...

This helps with deciphering medieval writing from the 14th to 16th century. It has helped me in understanding the old English style of writing from that period.

Sorry this post isn't tin related...

Regards Tin Miner
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