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Author NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
oildrum

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 17:33:06
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Morlock wrote:

A NCB Deputy told me about the hole break detector thingy, he seemed to imply that its use was not routine when firing in coal?


Of course every shot hole was cleaned out and tested for breaks before charging Wink

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'where's the shearer?'
IP: 82.14.59.163
Morlock

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 17:42:12
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The Deputy also said something like "there should be X amount of cable between the shot and the firing position", but the regulation failed to specify that the cable had to be run out off the drum? IP: 86.31.225.248
staffordshirechina

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Joined: 15/11/2009
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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 17:46:40
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Another of those wonderful procedures that sound good but in reality would never happen.
I remember once being shown a break detector on the shotfiring course............
IP: 95.148.24.174
oildrum

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 17:58:20
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staffordshirechina wrote:

Another of those wonderful procedures that sound good but in reality would never happen.
I remember once being shown a break detector on the shotfiring course............


Comes down to experience and where you're firing. Trouble is once you've pressed the button its too late to find out your mistakes

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'where's the shearer?'
IP: 82.14.59.163
Buckhill

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 21:58:27
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We can all laugh about the breaches of Regs that did no harm but they were made for a reason. Failure to test for breaks before charging a hole is in breach of Reg 52(2). The consequences can be serious.

The William Pit disaster of 1947 was caused by the firing of a shot in the roof of a waste (known as a Cuckoo shot). It had not been checked for breaks - there were Regs requiring this before the 1961 ones - and it was charged with a sheathed permitted explosive. It was concluded that (partly due to adiabatic compression) firedamp in a bed-separation cavity had been ignited via a break in the hole before passing to a large gas accumulation in the waste.

As a result of this disaster recommendations were made that the firing of Cuckoo shots be restricted. The 1961 Regs (reg 49) went further and prohibited them. I was told some years ago, by a deputy who had been in one of the rescue teams at William, that when his own pit closed and he transferred to Cannock he found a shotfirer charging a Cuckoo shot "because we've allus done it". 15 years on and still the lesson wasn't learnt - but my old friend soon put him right. There were few shotfirers in Cumberland, and Whitehaven in particular, who had a lax attitude to their job - we even had (and used) a break detector in a private mine which was not otherwise known for much in the way of compliance with Act or Regs.
IP: 81.155.96.224
Ty Gwyn

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 22:45:36
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How did this Break detector work? IP: 86.138.182.192
Morlock

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 02/12/2011 22:55:32
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Ty Gwyn wrote:

How did this Break detector work?


IIRC a long rod with protruding bit at 90 degrees to the rod end was run down the hole to check for cracks/fissures/de-laminations etc.

Edit: If you Google " shot hole break detector" second page throws up a pdf with a drawing.
IP: 82.31.24.156 Edited: 02/12/2011 23:09:05 by Morlock
Ty Gwyn

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 03/12/2011 00:17:15
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A scraper would do the same job i presume.

The pdf would nt come up for some reason.
IP: 86.138.182.192
Morlock

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 03/12/2011 00:43:19
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Appears to be fitted at the other end of the scraper rod.



IP: 82.26.220.47
Ty Gwyn

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 03/12/2011 10:06:11
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Thanks my friend,

I have a Copper Scraper,i doubt its more than 6mm thickness,will have to fish it out to check,its in the barn somewhere,folded over on itself a few times due to its length.
IP: 86.141.201.15
Morlock

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Posted: 03/12/2011 14:24:45
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First time I've actually seen a photo of the article, fits the description I remember from 45 years ago. IP: 86.27.36.191
staffordshirechina

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 03/12/2011 18:20:22
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Mr C's uncle Roy used to keep a break detector, new ramming stick, new cable and two new powder cans in his main level ready for if the Inspector came. They were hung up on wires like a museum exhibit. IP: 95.148.24.174
Ty Gwyn

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 03/12/2011 18:32:08
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staffordshirechina wrote:

Mr C's uncle Roy used to keep a break detector, new ramming stick, new cable and two new powder cans in his main level ready for if the Inspector came. They were hung up on wires like a museum exhibit.



New powder cans,was the supermarket shut?

Always new cables when inspection imminent
IP: 86.141.201.102
Buckhill

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 05/12/2011 17:07:48
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Morlock's picture shows the HSE spec. quite well.

The scraper end as shown is a common pattern - the spec. stating that "It is desirable that the scraper attachment should not compise more than half a disc, so as to minimise the risk of its mis-use for charging or stemming".

There was another way of clearing holes - compressed air, a length of metal tube (or alkathene water pipe in long holes) with a valve - much quicker.
IP: 81.155.96.224
Morlock

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 05/12/2011 17:38:06
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Buckhill wrote:

There was another way of clearing holes - compressed air, a length of metal tube (or alkathene water pipe in long holes) with a valve - much quicker.


I can remember drilling a few hols in limestone, probably about 1 3/4 inches diameter by around 4 feet deep. Dust was horrendous. Big Grin
IP: 82.26.150.149
Buckhill

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 05/12/2011 20:22:31
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MorlockI can remember drilling a few hols in limestone, probably about 1 3/4 inches diameter by around 4 feet deep. Dust was horrendous. Big Grin

Remember still the ripper drilling without water pre-dust mask days - cone of dust spilling off helmet onto shoulders, coughing guts up. "Why don't you use water?.."Think I want to catch my *^&$£$% death o' pneumonia?" Roll Eyes
IP: 81.155.96.224
Mr.C

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Location: North Staffordshire

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NCB oil lamp flame guide on Ebay.
Posted: 05/12/2011 23:15:33
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staffordshirechina wrote:

Mr C's uncle Roy used to keep a break detector, new ramming stick, new cable and two new powder cans in his main level ready for if the Inspector came. They were hung up on wires like a museum exhibit.

Now why dosn't that surprise me Big Grin
He's very much missed - his ME6 is on the shelf in front of me.

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If things dunner change - the'll stop as the' are.
IP: 2.27.7.150 Edited: 05/12/2011 23:20:36 by Mr.C
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