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Mine Exploration Forum

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Author Pits, Mines and Collieries
derrickman

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Joined: 18/02/2009

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 01/08/2010 06:57:56
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hence my earlier comment about it being a circular subject.

once you get past the very general usages, and basics like "shaft", there are so many variations by region and type of mining, and to some extent period, that there are no specific answers.

Most responses will essentially be, that the answer is whatever they are used to from their specific experience; and this is most true for UK coal miners who, because of the manner in which the UK coal industry was run from nationalisation to the early 90s, spent their whole working lives in a single area, quite often in one or two mines

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Ty Gwyn

Joined: 30/10/2009
Location: Lampeter

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 01/08/2010 10:41:47
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Derrickman,
Maybe i`ve confused things here,i should have stated at the start,i`ve only worked in Private Small Mines in South Wales,

So the terms i quoted,most likely would have been the same terms used in South Wales,Pre-Nationialisation,and even older,as our methods of working had`nt changed a great deal from the 1800`s.

To be honest,a lot of NCB workers in South Wales are not familiar with a lot of terms used by us Smallmine workers.

Take for instance the main drift the artery of the Colliery,we called it the Bully,and if you had a branch going of the main drift,also to the dip,we called that the Bully Cam,cam welsh for bend.

Just imagine how this was in the Kent Coalfield,where Colliers were drafted in from ,Wales Scotland,Durham etc,usually black listed Colliers who could`nt find work locally,because of standing up for thier rights and fair play wages,
All them different terms used,but like anything,if you know your job,it does`nt matter what something is called,you just get on with your work at hand.
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ICLOK

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Joined: 19/02/2008
Location: Ripley, Derbyshire up North.

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 02/08/2010 14:13:59
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This is interesting as I have tended to find when adding collieries and mines that you often get So and so Colliery No 5 Pit etc, however you also get So and So's pit.... I tend to stick to the name it was most commonly known as.... smaller mines oft seem to be known as pits!

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derrickman

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 14:06:55
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I think one thing which could be said, is that 'pit' for an underground mine, is entirely a coal mining usage.

I've never heard it used in a miscellaneous mining context, only as in 'open pit' to describe the technique ( as opposed to a specific location )
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Peter Burgess

Joined: 01/07/2008
Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 14:46:08
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The South East is full of chalk-pits, clay-pits, sand-pits, marl-pits, mine-pits, fullers earth pits, gravel-pits - virtually all open works for miscellaneous "minerals". The name is specific to location e.g. Southerham Pit, Betchworth Pits, etc etc

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Hé ! Ki kapcsolva le a villanyt ?
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Peter Burgess

Joined: 01/07/2008
Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 14:52:50
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A very few underground sites also were referred to as 'pits' but probably by association with an openwork. Godstone Village sand-pit had some underground workings but I am struggling to think of another example.

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Hé ! Ki kapcsolva le a villanyt ?
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RJV

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Joined: 16/03/2008
Location: Cleveland

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 14:55:08
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derrickman wrote:

I think one thing which could be said, is that 'pit' for an underground mine, is entirely a coal mining usage.

I've never heard it used in a miscellaneous mining context, only as in 'open pit' to describe the technique ( as opposed to a specific location )


Its sometimes used for ironstone mines in Cleveland - Park, Sheriffs, Lumpsey & Longacres Pits spring to mind.

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Rich
IP: 80.254.146.20 Edited: 03/08/2010 14:57:45 by RJV
Peter Burgess

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Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 14:59:41
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The iron mines in the Brendon Hills were named 'pits', possibly because of their association with the Ebbw Vale Company that owned them.

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Hé ! Ki kapcsolva le a villanyt ?
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Peter Burgess

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Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 15:12:29
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.... and although a collier can be variously defined as someone who produces charcoal, or someone who mines coal, or a ship that carries coal, a colliery seems to be simply a coal mine.

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Hé ! Ki kapcsolva le a villanyt ?
IP: 81.144.191.248 Edited: 03/08/2010 15:20:45 by Peter Burgess
Graigfawr

Joined: 04/11/2009

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 03/08/2010 18:39:58
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In mid Wales the historic term for a mine was 'gwaith' [= 'work'] e.g. 'Gwaith Frongoch' [= Frongoch Work], a usage that occurs back to at least the late seventeenth century and survived to be used on some OS maps and other official sources in the later C19. The last occurrence of it I saw was the highway sign pointing down from the A44 in Goginan village to the mine and houses adjacent: the c1960s bilingual highway sign read 'Gwaith Goginan / Old Goginan'. This wasn't a direct translation as 'hen' = 'old' and 'gwaith' = 'work'. Around 15 years ago the sign was replaced; the new sign regrettably using the wording 'Hen Goginan / Old Goginan', and thus the last visible reminder of the very old usage of 'gwaith' for 'mine' was lost. IP: 97.127.106.141
Peter Burgess

Joined: 01/07/2008
Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 04/08/2010 10:44:45
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Peter Burgess wrote:

A very few underground sites also were referred to as 'pits' but probably by association with an openwork. Godstone Village sand-pit had some underground workings but I am struggling to think of another example.


Of course, there are the underground fullers earth workings in east Surrey which were associated with the open pits for the same clay.

Quote from Geologists' Association Proceedings Vol. 1 May 7th, 1861

On the 9th of last month (April), the members of the Association made an excursion to the cretaceous deposits of the neighbourhood of Redhill and Reigate. The party, accompanied by the President, Professor Tennant, and others, arrived at Redhill at 11 o'Clock, and on being joined by Mr. Bensted, of Maidstone, and also by several ladies from the locality, proceeded to the Fuller's earth beds of Nutfield. The first object of interest which was visited was a pit on the right-hand side of the road, in which was seen a remarkable band of blue clay, about six inches in thickness, asserted by some to be Gault, but by others one of those bands of clay which occur at intervals in the Lower Greensand formation.

About twenty minutes' walk brought the party to the Cockley Pits, where a beautiful section of the blue Fuller's earth is exhibited. This earth is about twelve feet thick, and is beneath about twenty-five feet of Lower Greensand. So little is the demand at the present time for Fuller's earth, that the proprietor merely works the material out from beneath the stone, and thus long galleries are formed. A number of candles were procured, and several of the members inspected the cave, many points in which proved very instructive.



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Hé ! Ki kapcsolva le a villanyt ?
IP: 81.144.191.248 Edited: 04/08/2010 10:49:49 by Peter Burgess
Boggy

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Joined: 02/09/2007
Location: manchester

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Pits, Mines and Collieries
Posted: 10/08/2010 20:01:43
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in oldham most of the collieries were afectionaly called "pits"
for example "im goin down't pit tomoz", but on the other hand specific shafts were called pit...behind my house was oak colliery which had 3 shafts called duke pit albert pit and victoria pit ,to my left was bardsley colliery which had the diamond and victoria pits,and next to my house woodpark colliery of which the main haulage shaft is noted as "the deep pit".
so near me a pit is a shaft or on a local level a colliery,but as everyone pointed out there are huge regional variations of names and its all quite confusing .

edited my lousey spelling...


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if its a hole explore it...
IP: 81.106.44.75 Edited: 10/08/2010 20:03:18 by Boggy
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