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Author My Oldham Conversions
Morlock

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Posted: 02/04/2010 13:59:59
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Thanks Gentlemen, Mr Mikes input clarifies why some kit works whilst submerged but other kit does not like being damp. The lamp will have to be waterproof against the odd dipping.

Roy, I had forgotten about the positive (now negative) contact, also for some reason I had become side tracked with the idea of applying slight air pressure via the cable gland and doing a bubble test.
The drop it in a bucket approach, (minus the electronics) completely escaped me. Must be an age thing.

I think my safety doubts about what is new technology (for me), would suggest I carry a spare electronic bit.

One further question, am I correct in thinking that the LED set up is probably more shock resistant than a bulb?
IP: 86.31.165.143
royfellows

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Joined: 13/06/2007
Location: Great Wyrley near Walsall

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Posted: 02/04/2010 14:11:18
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Morlock wrote:



One further question, am I correct in thinking that the LED set up is probably more shock resistant than a bulb?


My opinion, definately yes, I have had Oldham bulbs fail on me underground as has a long standing underground companion.

--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 84.13.217.3
Morlock

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Posted: 02/04/2010 14:17:47
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royfellows wrote:

Morlock wrote:



One further question, am I correct in thinking that the LED set up is probably more shock resistant than a bulb?


My opinion, definately yes, I have had Oldham bulbs fail on me underground as has a long standing underground companion.


Thanks Roy, confirms a suspicion I had.
IP: 86.31.165.143
Morlock

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Posted: 02/04/2010 16:53:47
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Just remembered a mate passed on this product info.

Bit low for a Superlamp.

[web link]

Reflectors also available.

[web link]
IP: 82.26.123.232
mountainpenguin

Joined: 18/12/2006

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Posted: 02/04/2010 18:24:55
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the kind of water makes a difference too.
Nice clean slate water isnt very corrosive and so doesnt do too much damage.
Horrid acid metal mine water is more conductive and can corrode parts a lot quicker.
IP: 83.67.133.116
royfellows

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Posted: 02/04/2010 18:37:29
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Morlock wrote:

Just remembered a mate passed on this product info.

Bit low for a Superlamp.

[web link]

Reflectors also available.

[web link]


At 1 amp you would get about 1200 lumen which is impressive, but I struggle to see any good beam pattern. You can drive the XP-G at up to 1.5 amps according to Cree.

I am developing a 3 XP-G lamp using long range reflectors for 2 of them but awaiting parts. Beware the lack of spill when mounted behind any reflector, mine will use 2 in reflectors, plus 1 bare.

I have already started fitting these as the second emitter in my UniStars putting the output up to about 650 L.

There is a lot of mileage in the XP-G but it needs understanding.

--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 84.13.217.3
Morlock

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Posted: 02/04/2010 21:16:51
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mountainpenguin wrote:

the kind of water makes a difference too.
Nice clean slate water isnt very corrosive and so doesnt do too much damage.
Horrid acid metal mine water is more conductive and can corrode parts a lot quicker.


Yep, had some experience of that with a calculator that had survived clean bathwater and subsequent drying out, later to be wrecked by a paper mill floor puddle. Big Grin
IP: 86.23.55.82
Morlock

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Posted: 02/04/2010 21:23:16
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I can see you've done a bit of research on these Roy, I had some doubts about the available reflector beam angles. IP: 86.23.55.82
royfellows

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Posted: 03/04/2010 10:20:53
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Just off to Nenthead for a week and wont be posting. Dont get thinking I am dead.

--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 84.13.217.3
rhychydwr

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Joined: 09/06/2007
Location: Cwmparc, Rhondda, South Wales, UK.

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Posted: 07/04/2010 18:42:00
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royfellows wrote:

Just off to Nenthead for a week and wont be posting. Dont get thinking I am dead.


Looks like another barbecue folks all welcome. You know the address. I am told Piranhas taste really nice with ketchup Smile

--

Cutting coal in my spare time.
IP: 92.25.44.236
royfellows

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Posted: 13/05/2010 18:26:11
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For some time I have been considering the introduction of some new lamp models. I have myself been using the MagnumStar, this has been a useful test bed of new ideas although I have yet to produce one of these to offer for sale.

At the back of my mind from the start was the idea of a really powerful yet compact lamp, an idea that I had to put on hold for various reasons. Also, I have been aware of the potential demand for a slightly better version of my popular selling WorkStar conversion, it’s not everyone that wants a lamp that will cook bats, a lot of people just want a simple reliable lamp.

Another factor in my mind is desirability of giving people choice between a beam and a wide angle or flood lamp, the MagnumStar has this capability and I have been using this extensively.

Things came to head with the introduction by Cree Inc of their new range of XPG emitters with give a lot more light while at the same time generating considerably less heat. Obviously, this has potential to fill both of the above lamp criteria while at the same time the MagnumStar can be upgraded to these emitters to produce a really impressive output.

I have also been aware of the desirability of being able to mix and match lamps with various battery options, there is also the matter of some kind of standardisation. To this end all lamps will be produced with a 10 inch cable terminating in a plug that allows attachment of either belt or helmet mount battery packs.

Two types of plug are used dependant on the lamp voltage, standard Deans for 4V (parallel Li Ions) or XT60s for 8V (2 X Series Li Ions). All of the low voltage packs have circuitry to enable recharging from a standard Oldham charger including electronic and rack chargers. These create a very secure connection that requires force to separate, so connecting a belt pack by this means presents no problem, the connector is on the helmet side anyway.

Having just produced a prototype of the first of the new lamps, here is a description.

The EcoStar

Economy of power consumption, economy of weight, economy of cost.

This lamp has no external heatsinking, the LED module is all on a copper plate that secures to the positive terminal block at the bottom and to 2 offsets at the top that screw into the old pilot threads of the Oldham headset. As such is no heavier than a standard Oldham lamp. The heat produced sinks into the metal including the helmet bracket of the lamp body in the same way as the new model WorkStars.

There are 2 X Cree R5 XPG emitters, one is mounted bare right up against the glass, the other behind a long range reflector. The lamp is designed to run of parallel Li ions at approx 4V, and recharges off a standard Oldham charger, although a dedicated Duo charger is available.

SW1 powers the bare emitter at 350mA to produce an output (minimum) of 139 lumens, although Cree have produced over 200 at this current, so let’s say 139 to 200 lumens. This is a very pleasant illumination, somewhat reminiscent of the old carbide lamps, and eminently suitable for tight, wet cave systems or as a pilot light when charting underground in company. The output is quite remarkable and will suit most people for mine passages as well as caves.

SW2 will burn the bare emitter as above, plus the second through either low, medium, or maximum or 1050 mA to produce an output of 360 to 420 lumens, which combined with the first emitter gives an impressive total output of up to 620 lumens.

This is not a typo, yes 620 lumens with no extra weight in external heatsinks or thermodynamic conductors!



(click image to open full size image in new window)



(click image to open full size image in new window)

Burn Times

Flood alone 14 hrs

Plus Pwr 1 11.8 hrs
2 7.2 hrs
3 3.4 hrs

Above figures calculated from test readings against quoted cell capacity.

Max Internal Temperature, outdoor test = 54 degrees Centigrade
Attained after 30 minutes

I have worked out a price of £85 for this lamp, lamp built on brand new headset, 1 X 2 cell Li Ion helmet pack, plus 4mm shockcord for helmet attachment.

For the benefit of other lamp builders I strongly recommend building everything into a module as I have done. Avoid taping up drivers with electricians tape and tucking into the back of the lamp, half the bulk is the wiring anyway, plus you are sealing in the heat generated. Mount the drivers etc onto the metal, preferably aluminium or copper.


--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 84.13.74.93
royfellows

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Posted: 25/05/2010 18:21:36
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MagnumStar Mk 2

This is the final version of the MagnumStar, which many will think goes into nonsense territory.

Having said this I have produced a more useful lamp. It has 5 independent circuits working from 3 independent switched circuits with 4 different LED configurations. It is basically several lamps in one, as well as being insanely powerful.

First, I have changed from mounting the LED module by a screw passing though one of the reflector borings with an LED mounted over this and a screw in reflector, instead I have drilled the DX 5 bore reflector between 2 of the borings and machined a small flat area into the front to abut the head of the retaining screw. This has allowed me to extend the length of the heat conductor and give more room inside for electronics etc, as well as improving the beam of the ‘miners lamp’

Second, I have substituted 3 the other 3 Q5s with R5s.

Third I have provided another intermediate switch position.

So this is how it reads

The lamp switch does not do full rotations but turns through 180 degrees where full anti clockwise is consider “off”

So turning clockwise:

SW1 = ‘The miners lamp’ which is a single Cree Q5 XP-E WC driven at about 1050 mA to give an output of about 240 lumens. It looks similar beam size to a Fenix TK11 but with more side spill

SW2 = “The cavers lamp” which is a Cree MCE M BIN quad die with low medium and max settings. Max I calculate to be about 750 lumens. Medium is very useful as its running on only 1 amp but gives a splendid light.

Full clockwise brings in the power beam which is the Q5 at its 1050 mA plus 3 Cree R5 XP-G emitters running at between 1440 and 1470 mA each. I calculate the output to be in the region of 1400 lumens. It is not a narrow beam but quite a broad one similar to a car headlamp

Rotating the switch backwards anti clockwise will cause the power beam to stay on while gaining the other switch positions which does as follows.

SW2 will cause the flood, the Cree MCE to come on at whatever level the user wants in addition to the power beam. This gives a possible maximum output of 2400 lumens approx.
Seeing the lamp under ground, this figure looks entirely credible.

Rotating further back SW1 is gained, this causes 2 of the R5s to go out leaving the Q5 and the single R5 next to it to burn. This gives useful light output for slate mines and large limestone mines etc as a ‘walking lamp’.



(click image to open full size image in new window)

I struggle to see how any further improvements can be incorporated into this lamp and they could well be on sale before the end of the year.



--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 89.241.51.109
mine.hunter

Joined: 20/01/2008
Location: Pennant

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Posted: 29/05/2010 19:55:55
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Looks great Roy, put me down for one, Mike, Dylife Thumbs Up IP: 81.152.216.168
royfellows

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Posted: 21/06/2010 18:07:02
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THE TRIGON
This lamp is the last new design that I will be producing, I therefore feel it appropriate that before describing the lamp I run through the history of the project.

I started this about 18 months or more ago, and it has been an intensive learning curve, but a very interesting and absorbing time.
The main issue when I started with my lamp building was getting rid of the heat generated by the LEDs.
Initial thoughts were of getting aluminium extensions manufactured that would replace the Oldham bezel assembly, but with a forward thread to take this, in event a sort of aluminium extension. This would hopefully provide adequate external heatsinking as well as more interior room. The blow was the cost of having these made, this caused me to look in other directions.

After a lot of experimentation I developed a thermodynamic solution that produced the now familiar Oldham headset with the Hex nut front extension and the ‘Darth Vader helmet’ heatsink cowl. I fitted this with a cast aluminium reflector that had 3 borings for the LEDs. 2 Cree Q5 XR-E emitters were fitted, 1 working of the first switch position, the other 2 of the other, so it was either 1 or 2.

Testing indoors over about half and hour indicated a maximum internal temperature of 32 degrees centigrade, underground it barely got warm, a sure indication the system was capable of supporting a lot more. It was a good lamp, underground I met a chap with a standard Scurion who readily admitted my lamp was brighter.
My next experiment was to produce a similar lamp that had a 5 bore cast reflector and would power either the one, or 4 Crees at full power. This must have been producing between 900 and 1000 lumens yet running it indoors it never went above 72 degrees centigrade!

I also began to appreciate that testing indoors for temperature is no indication of the heat retained in the lamp underground.
From the start I underestimated the effectiveness of the system, it is now my contention that this system will give up heat better than a lamp made entirely of aluminium.

Next I devised electronics that would bring the 5th Q5 on line, the result was the first of the MagnumStars.
Since then the centre Q5 has been replaced with an MC-E quad die, 3 of the Q5s replaced by R5s and the electronics revised.

Now right from the beginning I have been desirous of producing a powerful lamp, but a lot smaller and lighter than the MagnumStar. Obviously with the systems ability to get rid of the heat produced there was considerable scope for reducing the heatsink area, dumping the front extension, and still being able to support several high power LEDs. The result was my Unistar lamp

With Crees announcement of the R5 XP-G series I saw a new window of opportunity with regard to my lamps. This emitter produces a lot more light than the old Q5 XR-E but a lot less heat, it also has a lower forward voltage. One of these can be driven at up to 1.5 amps to produce an output of 460 lumens.

After upgrading the Unistar to take of these as its second emitter, and the MagnumStar with 3 of these in the outer ring, I turned my attention to a new lamp.

The mission was to use the Unistar headset platform to utilise this new technology to as to produce a lamp small and lighter than the MagumStar as I feel many would gladly dump some of the MagnumStars output for a reduction in weight and size.

A noticeable feature of this lamp is the ‘binocular’ reflector; this provides excellent optics for the 2 XP-Gs behind it. There is a third emitter in the form of the ubiquitous Q5 XR-E behind a 12mm reflector that gives a good compromise between throw and spill.

Unlike the Unistar the lamp runs on my 8V battery series so can be connected to either a 4 cell helmet pack, a 4 cell belt mount pack, or the blue10 cell belt pack.

The Oldham switch has been modified to give a third position, but unlike the MagnumStar is free to rotate in either direction just like the original Oldham. I will explain how this works later.

Obviously, whichever circuit comes on line first is arbitrary, so for the sake of argument say it’s the single Q5. This can be run through several modes by flicking it on and off. The driver is the very tough and reliable DX ‘sandwich’ driver, it has low, medium and max settings, and also unfortunately the unwanted strobe and SOS. This driver on max pushes the Q5 at about 1050 mA to produce about 250 lumens, a lot of multimode drivers that work at this voltage range only push 850 mA be warned.

Rotating further in either direction brings the 2 X XP-Gs on line in addition to the Cree Q5 at any of the different mode settings, the R5s are series wired and run at about 550 mA to produce about 420 lumens.
Rotating the switch slightly further a slight resistance will be felt, at this point the lamp will flare up into Turbo mode as the R5s are now drawing 1.46 amps to produce an output of 920 lumens.

With the Q5 on max this gives a total output of about 1170 lumens, this is a spectacular beam from the excellent optics.
My original plan was to use 3 R5s with one bare up against the glass, but I dumped the idea in favour of the above.
Looking at the above switch options it can be seen that the lamp has 9 different modes in 3 groups, disregarding the strobe and SOS features.

The lamp will be offered on its own for a mix and match, or as a package.

The package will consist of:
The lamp
Either a 4 cell helmet pack with attachment shock cord, or 4 cell belt pack.
A balance charger with 220V AC/12V DC adaptor
An adaptor lead for connecting the battery pack to the charger.
An electronic battery test voltmeter.
For £150 or less.

Pictures show the lamp and the LED module. The drivers are heatsunk to the back of the copper mounting plate, the control circuits are designed to tuck in at the side of the lamp. The obvious resistor is a voltage step down for the sub miniature relay coils. The little black thingy is the Turbo Drive microswitch, it fits in top left between the leg of the thermal conductor and the headset rim.



(click image to open full size image in new window)

The different modes on the XP-Gs is achieved by switching different micro controller control resistors. Its a lot in a small space and needed careful planning.



(click image to open full size image in new window)



(click image to open full size image in new window)


(click image to open full size image in new window)
Test
Temperature, inside lamp tested outdoors, ambient 18 degrees Centigrade. Maxed out at 50 degrees C after 20 minutes.

I cannot get a table of figures to upload but her are some samples using a 4 cell battery pack.

If you set to the single Q5, medium will give 20 hours, full 9.6.
Power mode with the Q5 on low is economical power and gives 11.6 hours, this with Q5 on max 4.8 hours.

Turbo with Q5 on max, the full power gives 2.7 hours, still enough for a blazing walk through a slate mine.



--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 92.25.205.151
Morlock

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Posted: 21/06/2010 19:30:33
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Impressive. Smile IP: 82.26.207.131
SimonRL

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Posted: 23/06/2010 08:52:39
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Seriously impressive looking Roy! Are you going to be at Dylife this Saturday by any chance? IP: 83.148.135.213
royfellows

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Posted: 23/06/2010 12:14:59
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simonrl wrote:

Seriously impressive looking Roy! Are you going to be at Dylife this Saturday by any chance?


Sory, I am still too poorly to be far away from home. I have not been out for weeks.

--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 78.144.174.39
royfellows

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Posted: 28/06/2010 13:11:59
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This weekend I tested my lamps in a large limestone mine, the roadways were cut to take heavy plant.
Photographs do not really do justice as the human eye is a much better lens! However they should give some idea.
The Trigon lamp was very good and I am especially pleased with the eco power setting. This is SW 2 standard power, but with the Q5 on low. It lit the place up very well at about 500 lumens but only draws just over 3 watts, 4 cell helmet battery should give 11 hours.

A performance like this woudl have been regarded as fantasy years ago.

Trigon and Maggie were very user friendly and I am pleased with the way that you can flick the switch barely 1 mm and change from normal power to turbo and vise verse.
The MagnumStar power beam/half power beam is similar

Here are some photographs, straight off the camera, no messing with them.

#1 The standard Oldham


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#2 EcoStar on flood, R5 at 350 mA


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#3 EcoStar on max


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#4 Trigon on Turbo


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#5 MagnumStar medium flood, just over 4 watts in!


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#5 MagnumStar Full flood


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#6 MagnumStar Power Beam


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#7 MagnumStar Full power, power of 2 car headlamps on full beam. This is what 2400 lumens plus looks like.


(click image to open full size image in new window)

#8 MagnumStar on half power beam, useful mode for big mines


(click image to open full size image in new window)

Lamps are being produced and orders taken. Please check out latest on my [web link]

--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 89.240.94.75 Edited: 28/06/2010 13:14:02 by royfellows
SimonRL

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Posted: 28/06/2010 18:25:39
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Roy, they keep getting brighter and brighter Shocked Looking good Thumbs Up IP: 83.148.135.213
royfellows

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Posted: 28/06/2010 18:31:43
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simonrl wrote:

Roy, they keep getting brighter and brighter Shocked Looking good Thumbs Up


These are the final developments Simon, lamps now being produced for sale and taking orders

--

''the stopes soared beyond the range of our caplamps' - David Bick...... How times change
IP: 89.240.94.75
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