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Mine Exploration Forum

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Author Coal Mining Subsidence
Morlock

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 16/11/2009 16:16:51
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There are many areas of subsidence due to salt extraction around Cheshire.
They dissovled out the salt from a bed 8 feet thick, many interesting buildings about in the Lion Salt Works area. Smile

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JR

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Joined: 07/03/2008
Location: Lurking near Hereford

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 16/11/2009 17:16:04
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Morlock wrote:

There are many areas of subsidence due to salt extraction around Cheshire.
They dissovled out the salt from a bed 8 feet thick, many interesting buildings about in the Lion Salt Works area. Smile /quote]

It had skipped my memory but you see the same sight of buildings leaning on each other for support around Droitwich, Worcestershire for the same reason.

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The voices tell to write this stuff
IP: 84.71.79.187 Edited: 16/11/2009 17:19:10 by JR
Morlock

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 16/11/2009 17:39:20
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Yes, I'd forgotten about that area as well.

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It was the time of the preacher in the year of 01
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patch

Joined: 09/07/2008
Location: North Cumbria

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 17/11/2009 09:59:45
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It's not just houses and buildings that are affected. Several years ago British Gypsum had to fork out to have a three quarter mile new road built because the road from the A6 to Cotehill near Carlisle was in danger of dropping into the old Cocklakes Gypsum Mine. Although Cocklakes had been closed for a long time, they were still liable for the cost of the new road.
The upside of subsidence of this mine is that it has provided several "new" lakes which have been utilised by anglers. I image it's the same with salt extraction in Cheshire.

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Don't wait for a light to appear at the end of the tunnel, stride down there and light the damn thing yourself
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Cat_Bones

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Joined: 07/06/2007
Location: Shropshire

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 17/11/2009 17:33:12
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Holes open up round Telford fairly regularly as a result of the old coal workings. There's a road a couple of miles from me that was closed for ages because of the hole that opened up in the middle of it. There's some pics on ME of some workings which were temporarily accessible a while ago when a hole appeared in a field. Supposedly, smoke can be seen from time to time in that area due to the old workings a few feet under the surface spontaneously catching fire. All the workings will probably get destroyed by open-casting due to take place soon.
There's a lot of subsidence in the Ironbridge area too although I think this is mainly due to geology rather than the extensive mining. There's one or 2 very wonky houses that have been twisted around over the years. There's also at least one shaft that looks like it's sheared off part way down where the sides of the valley have slid down-hill!
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Morlock

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 17/11/2009 19:59:36
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Cat_Bones wrote:

All the workings will probably get destroyed by open-casting due to take place soon.


When they open-casted the area of Parc Slip Colliery it was interesting to see the old galleries which had not been seen for many years. Smile

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Cat_Bones

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 17/11/2009 20:23:29
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Morlock wrote:

Cat_Bones wrote:

All the workings will probably get destroyed by open-casting due to take place soon.


When they open-casted the area of Parc Slip Colliery it was interesting to see the old galleries which had not been seen for many years. Smile


Would be cool to see stuff like that but also a bit gutting, knowing you'll never get to explore them!
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Morlock

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 17/11/2009 20:30:17
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Cat_Bones wrote:

Morlock wrote:

Cat_Bones wrote:

All the workings will probably get destroyed by open-casting due to take place soon.


When they open-casted the area of Parc Slip Colliery it was interesting to see the old galleries which had not been seen for many years. Smile


Would be cool to see stuff like that but also a bit gutting, knowing you'll never get to explore them!


Exploration was not possible in this case as the mine was flooded to within 10-15 feet of the surface, it was only accessible later due to the pumping carried out as the opencast deepened.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Slip_colliery

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It was the time of the preacher in the year of 01
IP: 86.31.127.115 Edited: 17/11/2009 20:33:25 by Morlock
Ty Gwyn

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 17/11/2009 20:51:47
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A few years back,there was a degree of subsidance on the M6 near Coventry,due to Daw Mill workings. IP: 89.243.61.231
Graigfawr

Joined: 04/11/2009

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 18/11/2009 00:37:15
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A geotechnical study in the late 1980s concluded that the central portion of the south Wales coalfield had decreased in altitude by about 6m due to coal seam extraction. This was not localised subsidence but the decrease in altitude above sea level of hundreds of square miles. Presumably other major coalfields which have experienced substantially complete extraction of multiple seams are likely to have experienced similar decreases in altitude. IP: 78.150.60.68
carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 06/12/2009 18:23:38
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Came across this quite interesting photo taken 1978.

Coal Mine Subsidence near Sheridan, Wyoming. Surface subsidence effects above abandoned coal mines 10 to 15 kilometers north of Sheridan. Subsidence depressions and pits above the Old Monarch Mine in operation from 1904 to 1921. Rectangular depressions, some of which are bounded by pits, are evident on the right. Some of the pits are sealed at the bottom and provide sufficient moisture to support trees (foreground).


(click image to open full size image in new window)



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ICLOK

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 06/12/2009 19:38:24
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Thems big termites... fascinating pic CK Thumb Up

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tomh

Joined: 16/07/2009
Location: st austell

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 06/12/2009 22:28:10
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My friends dad used to live in a cottage at frogpool near united downs when it was working and he said you could hear the carts going along the rails beneath the cottage IP: 87.112.67.52
derrickman

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Joined: 18/02/2009

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 07/12/2009 05:35:02
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Cat_Bones wrote:

Morlock wrote:

Cat_Bones wrote:

All the workings will probably get destroyed by open-casting due to take place soon.


When they open-casted the area of Parc Slip Colliery it was interesting to see the old galleries which had not been seen for many years. Smile


Would be cool to see stuff like that but also a bit gutting, knowing you'll never get to explore them!


gas and bad air constraints still apply...

there is settlement of 4-5m around M1 J29 from historic coal mine workings, mostly relatively shallow drift mining at Doe Lea

I worked on a tunnel project in Mansfield for a short while in the early 90s and found settlement of 2-3m in places, levelling around the OS TBMs. This was well known locally, in general terms although not in detail
IP: 217.41.226.169 Edited: 07/12/2009 05:37:41 by derrickman
ICLOK

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Location: Ripley, Derbyshire up North.

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 07/12/2009 12:28:36
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The biggest coal mining subsidence I remember in the Erewash Vally was between Langley Mill and Stoneyford on the 4 track mainline. You used to be able to look all the way up to SF and see the 4 tracks go over the top of the gradient summit about a mile away, got down their one day (late 70s) and a second artifial summit had appeared, so instead of a continuous grade the line now went up then level then up... you can still see the huge amounts of ballast used to semi correct it... the line dropped afew feet in about 5 days... you can still see the gradient change to this day. Then in same area 2-3 years ago a shaft opened up next to the line closing it again ....!

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Cerne

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 08/12/2009 22:53:10
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More than a few subsidence problems on the railways. Always rather liked this one, only steam engine to get a decent burial: [http://lindal-in-furness.co.uk/Heritage/lindalhole.htm] IP: 86.136.174.211
JohnnearCfon

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Joined: 22/12/2005
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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 09/12/2009 08:21:31
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Cerne wrote:

More than a few subsidence problems on the railways. Always rather liked this one, only steam engine to get a decent burial: [[web link]]


Interesting photos and article. Looking at the fourth photo it would appear that some of the sidings were laid with "baulk road".
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ICLOK

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 09/12/2009 09:00:06
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Cerne, that was fascinating stuff thanks... I've saved that as its the type of thing I put into talks. Thumbs Up

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derrickman

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 09/12/2009 09:18:46
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is this the incident referred to in the 'Thomas the Tank Engine' story?

a propos 'baulk construction', isn't this particularly associated with Brunel's 7ft gauge designs?... getting further off topic, I didn't realise until quite recently that many early US railroads were constructed to broad gauges between 5ft and 6ft
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JohnnearCfon

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Coal Mining Subsidence
Posted: 09/12/2009 09:33:18
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derrickman wrote:


a propos 'baulk construction', isn't this particularly associated with Brunel's 7ft gauge designs?...


This was discussed on another thread recently (the Butterley thread).
IP: 89.241.83.98 Edited: 09/12/2009 09:37:38 by JohnnearCfon
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