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Mine Exploration Forum

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Author False flooring photos
SimonRL

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 14:34:16
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Following on from the thread started by C-J, does anybody have a good photo of a section of false floored tunnel from above and below? Doesn't need to be the same tunnel / stope, but just something to illustrate that what can look like solid floor or the bottom of the stope from the top side, ofen looks, well, quite different from underneath Wink IP: 83.148.135.213
Captain Scarlet

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 14:43:09
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Here are a few :











--

Now then...
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sparty_lea

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 15:33:49
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(click image to open full size image in new window)
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C-J

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 15:48:49
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JEEEZ!

so what your saying is assume the quality of the ceiling is very similar to what your walking on???

Some of these look nasty! especially regarding the quality of the wood!

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royfellows

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Joined: 13/06/2007
Location: Great Wyrley near Walsall

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 18:21:47
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This is for the benefit of the less knowledgeable, to most of you it will be old hat.

Levels can be either crosscuts or drives.
A crosscut is driven through barren rock to cut a vein at an angle, apart from the chance of a concealed winze there is no reason for the level to have a false floor.

A drive or drift is what it suggests, a level driven on a vein, if it isn’t stoped you will at least see it in the roof of the level. If it is stoped out above, there is a good chance that it is also stoped out below. If water is dripping from above and yet the floor is dry, be suspicious. Veins are seldom vertical but slope or "hade" slightly, where the side of the level passes over your head this is the hanging wall, the other is the footwall. If on a vein it is a good idea to keep to the footwall side, if false floored there is often a bit of a ledge on this side.

A variation on a drift is what is called in Wales a "side tie" or in Cornwall a "footwall drive" where the level is not driven directly on the vein but along side it in the footwall. The main purpose of this is to keep the tramming level clear.

The condition of false floors can vary as much as being safe enough to drive a bus over to being completely rotten and about to collapse. The odd thing is that often floors put in the 19th century are as sound as a nut, while floors in the 20th century can be as rotten as a pear. Basically it’s the quality of the timber. Cornwall used pitch pine a lot which was often imported. Wales was plentiful in timber but in this century a lot of what was used was rubbish.
Unfortunately, sometimes even basically sound timbers can drop due to rotting at the ends.

Sometimes there can be false floor and concealed holes under a few feet of water, when wading be careful to avoid these going in, but remember that the water will be stirred up when you come out. However, a comforting thought is that timber kept completely submerged will often remain good.

Where collapses have occurred, stacked deads or waste can sometimes remain in place, it’s sometimes described as “hanging death” or by being held there by “anti gravity” which of course does not exist. Basically, it’s a natural phenomena known as “corbelling” whereby it has settled over the years and when the supporting timbers fall away it forms a natural arch, but the slightest disturbance and it can all go.

These are just a few notes that I felt like putting down.


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Vanoord

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 19:33:47
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C-J wrote:

JEEEZ!

so what your saying is assume the quality of the ceiling is very similar to what your walking on???

Some of these look nasty! especially regarding the quality of the wood!


The floor that you're walking on is quite possibly the ceiling of the floor below - which is the ceiling of the floor below... and so on!

Basically, don't assume that just because the floor looks like it's made of rock that it is rock Shocked

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Roy Morton

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 22:13:07
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South Caradon 2000



(click image to open full size image in new window)



(click image to open full size image in new window)

Always beware of wooden launders on the floor of the drive as this is also a clue that what you are standing on is porous.
Tresavean was a near vertical lode and the levels were stacked one above the other. See also some of the JC Burrows pictures of Dolcoath.

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IP: 81.153.210.132 Edited: 09/04/2009 22:24:36 by Roy Morton
carnkie

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False flooring photos
Posted: 09/04/2009 22:29:58
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Mention of Burrows couldn't resist posting a couple although not that relevant. I never cease to be amazed at the quality.


(click image to open full size image in new window)
The bottom of Cook's Kitchen Engine Shaft 1893.


(click image to open full size image in new window)
Above the 406, Cook's Kitchen 1893.


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Roy Morton

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False flooring photos
Posted: 10/04/2009 00:41:03
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The Burrows' shots I had in mind were these;



(click image to open full size image in new window)



(click image to open full size image in new window)

Nice lighting. Photo of the month for October 1893?

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carnkie

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False flooring photos
Posted: 10/04/2009 00:49:15
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I still haven't worked out what he used the hydrogen for. must have been slightly dodgy.

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The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.
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LAP

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False flooring photos
Posted: 10/04/2009 17:44:42
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some pretty amazing pics there Roy

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Heloo
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hymac580c

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False flooring photos
Posted: 11/04/2009 09:33:51
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The condition of the floor especially in a large multi level mine always gives me the thought of that when there is a collapse of the roof it is also the weakening of the floor in the level above, as well as the floor I might be standing on.
I have come accross rotten timbers in the floor of inclines which cover the top of tunnels of different veins crossing accross.
I always tend to walk to the side when walking up old, long unused inclines if possible as my foot went thru a rotting timber floor on a fairly recent venture, and it is something I don't forget.

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james cartwright

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 12:23:13
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i allways go by if a floor is wet then its a good indicator that theres not much but solid rock below IP: 88.104.78.93
SimonRL

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 12:30:17
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james cartwright wrote:

i allways go by if a floor is wet then its a good indicator that theres not much but solid rock below


Ah but you do you know you're not standing on 200' of flooded stope but the natural drainage level is just a wee bit higher than the floor? Wink
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sparty_lea

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 12:30:26
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james cartwright wrote:

i allways go by if a floor is wet then its a good indicator that theres not much but solid rock below

Doesn't always work though, for example, in an understoped horse level where the workings below are full of water.
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sparty_lea

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 12:35:39
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simonrl wrote:

james cartwright wrote:

i allways go by if a floor is wet then its a good indicator that theres not much but solid rock below


Ah but you do you know you're not standing on 200' of flooded stope but the natural drainage level is just a wee bit higher than the floor? Wink


Laugh Laugh Laugh SNAP!

Its surprising how well a muddy floor can hold water in higher stopes sometimes too.
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Captain Scarlet

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 12:40:34
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False floors were often constructed with a layer of timber, then stones and finally, clay. The clay was to prevent water percolating into workings below that would then require pumping out.

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Vanoord

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 13:29:48
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Colonel Mustard wrote:

False floors were often constructed with a layer of timber, then stones and finally, clay. The clay was to prevent water percolating into workings below that would then require pumping out.


How very sensible!

I suppose that also explains how a false floor can stay there even if the timbers rot away to nothing - the clay will bind the stones together as a rough sort of mortar, leaving a rather unpleasant trap for the unwary mine explorer.

As someone who is mostly used to slate mines and nice passages driven through solid rock, I must admit to believing that metal mines and false floors are something from the dark side! Big Grin

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RJV

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 13:48:49
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Vanoord wrote:


As someone who is mostly used to slate mines and nice passages driven through solid rock, I must admit to believing that metal mines and false floors are something from the dark side! Big Grin


These would be the slate mines with bits of roof the size of family cars liberally scattered around the floor then?
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sparty_lea

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False flooring photos
Posted: 15/04/2009 13:49:00
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Vanoord wrote:


As someone who is mostly used to slate mines and nice passages driven through solid rock, I must admit to believing that metal mines and false floors are something from the dark side! Big Grin


As someone used to nice compact metal mines where you can get a good view of the condition of the roof and the bits that peel off are generally less than the size of a bus, I must confess to viewing slate mines as something from the dark side Big Grin

EDIT
D*m I'm slow this morning!
IP: 79.71.137.210 Edited: 15/04/2009 13:53:10 by sparty_lea
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