Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Jump to page << < 1 2 > >>
Author Mine acoustics
rglover

Joined: 17/07/2017

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 14:27:51
Reply |  Quote
Hello everyone,
I'm new on here and am interested in the acoustics of mines. I'd like to make some recordings of various sites around the UK and would love to hear about which mines you have noticed particularly interesting acoustics in. I've never been into any so tis is all a totally new venture.
Im currently staying in the Rheidol valley and thought I'd try and make some recordings here. If anyone has any tips for locations or advice would love to hear it!

Thanks in advance
Rebecca
IP: 87.112.137.159
robnorthwales

Joined: 21/05/2008
Location: Denbighshire, North wales

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 14:49:55
Reply |  Quote
Slate mines tend to have the best acoustics - big flat surfaces on the walls and ceilings for sound to be reflected off.

There's one mine in particular (Rhiw Bach, up by Penmachno), that has a stream running down the main incline. In wet weather it really roars, sounds more like Niagara falls !

Oh. One thing though. Remember that these are abandoned mines. Loud noises and/or vibrations can shake things loose from overhead. When the mines were working, the roofs were checked very frequently by tapping with a long metal rod. A dull thud indicated an area that was becoming unstable. A 'ringing' sound indicated solidity.
Much like the old wheeltappers on the railways.
IP: 92.29.160.218
rglover

Joined: 17/07/2017

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 14:54:07
Reply |  Quote
Amazing thanks! Will add that to my list. Sounds really interesting.
I'm thinking of making models of some of the mines to turn into instruments. This is just the beginning of the research.
IP: 87.112.137.159
gNick

Avatar of gNick

Joined: 19/03/2012
Location: Pity Me, Durham

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 15:12:34
Reply |  Quote
Oddly the dry stone arching common in the North Pennines is remarkably dead acoustically, like a stone anechoic chamber.

--

Don't look so embarrassed, it's a family trait...
IP: 194.151.7.200
legendrider

Avatar of legendrider

Joined: 13/07/2014
Location: Darlington

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 15:17:37
Reply |  Quote
clean-cut passages through the likes of sandstone or limestone sometimes lend themselves to a peculiar standing-wave effect. If you hum a deep note, it reverberates with a pleasing throb. *

Of course, this only works well where the rock is big, slabby and reflective. Shale, arching and timber all absorb and diffuse sounds.

I recall a TV documentary about a megalithic passage tomb where archaeologists had found a crude carving showing 'ghosts' in a row. When the acoustic scientists came with their gadgetry, they demonstrated that a standing wave could be created vocally in the passage, much as I have described, which would cause dust on the passage floor to flutter and flurry, and concluded that these were the 'ghosts'. Thus an ancient priest, druid or shaman could chant and scare the bejesus out of their faithful flock by well thought-out application of science, even if the principles were not well understood!

MARK

* note for Jim McPherson - try this in Skears Firestone about 1500ft inbye
IP: 86.138.105.192
ttxela

Avatar of ttxela

Joined: 04/09/2007
Location: Cambs

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 15:20:36
Reply |  Quote
As I recall the perfectly spherical chambers in Excelsior tunnel had interesting acoustics, what with being specifically designed to collect vibrations?

I also recall blowing my nose in a railway tunnel somewhere in the FoD whilst my companions attention was diverted elsewhere and the resulting echoes properly startled them!

A fellow I went on a trip with some years ago was doing something similar and spent quite a while recording drips into pools and similar. I didn't get to hear the final result but I imagine it could be quite atmospheric.
IP: 188.39.178.242 Edited: 17/07/2017 15:27:25 by ttxela
mistericeman

Joined: 04/10/2009
Location: Ashton-under-Lyne (Manchester)

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 15:34:38
Reply |  Quote
Passage to the right of the water wheel in Ystrad Einion near to Machynlleth has some fantastic acoustics if you hum a low note.....
Watch the floors in there as there are some silt covered false platforms under the water in places.
IP: 94.197.121.211
RAMPAGE

Avatar of RAMPAGE

Joined: 01/03/2015
Location: Everywhere

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 15:37:42
Reply |  Quote
Setting off a large gunpowder blast in a massive slate mine chamber sounds amazing, you get such an amazing boom, its indescribably powerful...

--

I ain''t gettin on no plane. Fool.
IP: 62.133.4.6
Margot

Avatar of Margot

Joined: 07/05/2011
Location: Anglesey

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 15:41:41
Reply |  Quote
I quite liked the acoustics in Gwaynllifion, where a level ends with a crossing of which three out of the four passages are only some two meters long or so. Made my singing sound good! That means something. The mine is a bit of a ****** to get to though. Lots of wrestling through vegetation. IP: 147.143.13.7
AR

Avatar of AR

Joined: 07/11/2007
Location: Knot far from Knotlow in the middle of the Peak District

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 21:42:52
Reply |  Quote
I'm very fond of the acoustics in the third chamber down of Whalf Pipe (Hillocks Mine) in Derbyshire, I usually go there to keep up the old miners tradition of T'Owd Man's candle on Christmas Eve - this is the recording I made last year singing a proper miner's carol:

https://vimeo.com/197080938

I've also found that Groaning Tor level has good reverb at certain points.

--

Oh God of Sarcasm, thanks for everything...
IP: 80.247.25.171
Graigfawr

Joined: 04/11/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 22:25:09
Reply |  Quote
When surveying one of the Rheidol United levels the whole place began to hum, building in volume and lowering in pitch until we had to shout to be heard. It sounded as if the entire place was on the verge of collapse but we couldn't imagine why. So we legged it to the entrance - just in time to see the end of one of the Vale of Rheidol Railway trains finish passing as it flogged its way up the gradient towards Devil's Bridge.

Had a somewhat similar experience whilst dangling in an large open stope at Cwmystwyth only even louder and lasting a shorter length of time - but on that occasion it was a low-flying military jet.
IP: 188.221.169.101
BertyBasset

Avatar of BertyBasset

Joined: 13/12/2007
Location: Caernarfon, North Wales

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 17/07/2017 22:54:35
Reply |  Quote
We were having a surface wander around Parys yesterday, and chucked a couple of stones down the East Twll (having checked there was no one down there first) There's a fairly flat wall, roughly orthogonal to the bottom of the pit (give and take a few tens of degrees) which gives superb moderate delay echoes.

I recall from the midst of time that you can record an impulse response at such locations, then use convolution to combine the impulse response with new audio to recreate the effect of that audio being played in the original location. So, an impulse response library of underground sites could be quite an interesting archive.

Robin
IP: 86.164.58.183
robnorthwales

Joined: 21/05/2008
Location: Denbighshire, North wales

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 00:02:44
Reply |  Quote
Graigfawr wrote:

When surveying one of the Rheidol United levels the whole place began to hum, building in volume and lowering in pitch until we had to shout to be heard. It sounded as if the entire place was on the verge of collapse but we couldn't imagine why. So we legged it to the entrance - just in time to see the end of one of the Vale of Rheidol Railway trains finish passing as it flogged its way up the gradient towards Devil's Bridge.

Had a somewhat similar experience whilst dangling in an large open stope at Cwmystwyth only even louder and lasting a shorter length of time - but on that occasion it was a low-flying military jet.


A bizarre experience on one occasion - diving in Vivian quarry in Llanberis (we had some trainees for their first dives), and all of sudden, I can hear what sounds like a powerboat - I've done enough warm-water diving to have the alarm bells go off in my head when such a sound happens. You can feel the noise of it through the water.
Followed a moment later by the thought "A powerboat, in here ?".
Various other divers looking around cautiously too. Anyway, we can't see anything, so assumed it must have been out on the lake, and continue with the dive.
We can hear this thing all the way through the rest of the dive. No change in pitch, no moving away.
Only when we got out did someone tell us it was the sound of the turbines kicking up in Electric Mountain, a few hundred yards away ...
IP: 87.114.101.229
dwarrowdelf

Avatar of dwarrowdelf

Joined: 09/02/2011
Location: Lost in Cwmorthin...and Oakeley too !!

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 13:55:27
Reply |  Quote
Yes, slate mines tend to be rather good in this regard - but then I just like a "stone acoustic" having sang in a number of cathedrals and churches on various occasions. When you get it right such an environment carries the voice very well, and you seem to make less effort, as if the space and stone are doing everything to help, rather than hinder. Stone spaces are great, if the shape/size is right - a very complex subject - as a music/ sound recording engineer keeps reminding me, so I won't even pretend to begin to understand it. But still I know when I like an acoustic effect. The wedge shaped chambers, like a concert hall, for example typical of many slate mines seem very promising. I think one or a small number of voices would be rather good.(The slate quarry men sang underground on occasion) Not sure about a large orchestra with/without large choir however Confused

Remember something about one of the chambers at Honister slate mine being used for musical performances on occasion -cool Smile

--

'I wonder how many breakfasts, and other meals we have missed inside that nasty clockless, timeless hole?' 'The Hobbit' J R R Tolkien.
IP: 176.249.121.59 Edited: 18/07/2017 22:36:46 by dwarrowdelf
Mr Mike

Avatar of Mr Mike

Joined: 09/06/2007
Location: Bury - In The Laboratory

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 16:24:02
Reply |  Quote
In Poland, a lot of the working mines (salt especially) use some of the chambers after extraction for concerts because of the acoustics.

--

Mr Mike www.mineexplorer.org.uk
IP: 79.74.243.209
ttxela

Avatar of ttxela

Joined: 04/09/2007
Location: Cambs

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 16:27:43
Reply |  Quote
The Nerja showcave in Spain has a concert venue with permanent fixed seating underground. It's all natural not mined though.

Not far from my sister-in-laws house Smile
IP: 188.39.178.242
Morlock

Avatar of Morlock

Joined: 31/07/2008

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 16:30:47
Reply |  Quote
Well worth a watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqCMm10mtZQ
IP: 86.183.190.136
Cat_Bones

Avatar of Cat_Bones

Joined: 07/06/2007
Location: Shropshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 18:57:25
Reply |  Quote
legendrider wrote:


I recall a TV documentary about a megalithic passage tomb where archaeologists had found a crude carving showing 'ghosts' in a row. When the acoustic scientists came with their gadgetry, they demonstrated that a standing wave could be created vocally in the passage, much as I have described, which would cause dust on the passage floor to flutter and flurry, and concluded that these were the 'ghosts'. Thus an ancient priest, druid or shaman could chant and scare the bejesus out of their faithful flock by well thought-out application of science, even if the principles were not well understood!


I'd be interested to hear more about this. Neolithic tombs are a particular interest of mine and I've never heard of this. Intrigued by the mention of depictions of ghosts... in the UK there are very very few examples of art within the structures and in Ireland, where neolithic art is much more common, the designs are abstract with no clear depictions of people (that I'm aware of). I vaguely recall seeing something on tv about acoustics in Maeshowe (iirc) but there's no art like that in that tomb.
IP: 86.3.184.190
AR

Avatar of AR

Joined: 07/11/2007
Location: Knot far from Knotlow in the middle of the Peak District

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 18/07/2017 21:26:05
Reply |  Quote
I think it may have been something Paul Devereux did, I've got a copy of his book "Stone Age Soundtracks" somewhere so I'll try and find it and have a look.

--

Oh God of Sarcasm, thanks for everything...
IP: 80.247.25.171
legendrider

Avatar of legendrider

Joined: 13/07/2014
Location: Darlington

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Mine acoustics
Posted: 19/07/2017 12:44:28
Reply |  Quote
Cat_Bones wrote:

I vaguely recall seeing something on tv about acoustics in Maeshowe (iirc) but there's no art like that in that tomb.


That's about the sum total of my recollection; the 'art' was little more than faint scratches, which were interpreted as fitting the acoustic data. Could have been Maes Howe but not sure, and I use the word 'tomb' loosely! I'll keep my eye on the Skeleton Channel see if its ever repeated!

MARK

--

festina lente IP: 86.180.104.103
Jump to page << < 1 2 > >>
Safety LED Miners Caplamps Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page