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Mine Exploration Forum

Author Devon and Cornwall mine data base
carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 15/12/2007 16:00:28
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I expect most of you were aware of this but I certainly wasn't. Looks interesting and, to say the least, quite cheap.

http://www.dawnmist.demon.co.uk/minedata.htm
IP: 88.105.222.41
Tin Miner

Joined: 24/06/2007

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 19/12/2007 22:13:04
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With the greatest respect to Heather this data-base is very old and incomplete. There are many mistakes in it which she hasn't had time to rectify.
My data-base of Devon mines is also incomplete, but has 2,791 mines listed with the information that's been available to me from Record Offices, Libraries, and mining books.
I'll be publishing a "Gazetteer" of Devon Mines within the next year, so watch this space.
Regards Tin Miner

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If at first you don't succeed feck it or try again
IP: 77.100.64.198
royfellows

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Joined: 13/06/2007
Location: Great Wyrley near Walsall

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 20/12/2007 09:58:17
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What format are you developing in Tin Miner?

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'There's a lot of activity for a disused mine!' - Bond in 'A view to a kill'
IP: 78.150.55.198
Tin Miner

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 20/12/2007 15:34:01
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Up to now I have created an A5 book in Micrsoft Publisher (48 pages) This will be easier for me for printing when I can finally get my head around to finishing it. I know that it will be incomplete, but it has been on-going since 2000 when I first published a gazeteer of Dartmoor's mines. That attempt was not very good as since then I've found out so many more including "Streamworks, Beams, Alluival works etc" and have included all those. Also, included are the "Tinners' Huts, Smelting-houses, Blowing-houses etc" of Dartmoor.
When I feel that I've got no more to offer for the publication then I'll get around to printing it out and selling it.
Regards Tin Miner

--

If at first you don't succeed feck it or try again
IP: 77.100.64.198
royfellows

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Location: Great Wyrley near Walsall

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 20/12/2007 18:24:46
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Sounds like you are doing OK on your own Tin Miner and I commend your effort.

The reason I asked about the format is that I have something that I developed some years ago for the West Cumbria Mine Research Group, (reading this Dave Banks). I developed the database as a normalised multi relational Microsoft Access run-time application. The population was by WCMRG member Dave Kelly who added 11175 miners, 4020 addresses where miners lived, with employments at 400 mines. The effort of Dave Kelly is truly remarkable, the above numbers are correct and not typo errors. Being multi relational it obviously has advanced search and reporting functionality, and would require little effort to 'back end' an Internet website.
The origins are interesting as it was originally developed by Dave who produced, and I emphasise no disrespect intended here; a mess. This is actually quite common. Access is deceptively easy to get into, like a beach on a warm day, and the sea looks so tempting. One goes for a paddle, the water is nice so one takes a further step, water is now up to your thighs and one more step and the bottom takes a sudden plunge!
To develop professionally with MS Access one needs a good working knowledge of the relational model, structured query language, and the Visual Basic for Applications programming language amongst quite a few other things. To develop commercial databases, add mathematics, book keeping and accountancy. The learning curve is 5 years + full time.

Anyway, back to subject. The above database is readily adaptable to any purpose with a change of title etc. Roy Morton has a copy that he is populating with information that he has spent quite some time putting together.
It is capable of importing data from other formats using Open Database Connectivity Drivers (ODBC) such as Excel, dBase, FoxPro, CSV text files or whatever. It also supports OLE whereby photographs etc can be embedded in the database for rapid retrieval, this is by means of a simple Windows browse dialog box, "Where is my picture" all automated with Visual Basic. There is however an issue here whereby the Microsoft Jet 4 data engine will only support a data file of 2 gigabytes. It could however be migrated to a server database such as SQL Server which has no limit.

The bottom line is this is freely available to anyone who can use it, although importing from above described 'flat file' systems could sometimes necessitate manual linking between different data tables to create the relationship.

The application is really a simple lightweight effort having a mere 15 tables and little source code. My 'heavy weight' financial management application has 71 tables and enough source code to fill an encyclopaedia, the main code blocks in 41 modules, and deployment is at 150 megs with an empty data file.

Update 21/12/07
Seeing no response to this posting I have to make myself clear. Basically, if anyone wants this, buck shee, its there for the asking. However, it would be better if I did any data importing from other formats on a turnaround basis. I know that there are people out there developing databases in various forms, I just want to try and help.


--

'There's a lot of activity for a disused mine!' - Bond in 'A view to a kill'
IP: 78.150.55.198 Edited: 21/12/2007 14:14:02 by royfellows
Bob Pit

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Joined: 05/12/2007
Location: Devon

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 28/12/2007 12:40:58
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Roy.

Yeah I know where you're coming from with MS access. I made the mistake of using it for a database for a thesis, much to the amusement of my computer scientist son. Its easy to create the data base but the MS version of SQL is so cr@p that running queries is hopeless.

My Access database has a similar theme to TM's but contains mainly the surface field evidence of mines. I have the use of ArcGis at my workplace so I'm hoping to be able to produce a GIS for all the mines on Dartmoor. I'd like to share it on tinternet somehow but I haven't even considered the technicalities of doing so.


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carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 28/12/2007 14:15:25
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I’m probably teaching granny to suck eggs again but one interesting data base I stumbled across on the web was complied by Alasdair Neill. It is an index to newspapers-extractive industries,

CONTENTS
LIST OF NEWSPAPERS INCLUDED
MINES CORNWALL
STAMPING MILLS
ARSENIC WORKS
SMELTING WORKS
ENGINES, MACHINERY, TECHNOLOGY, FOUNDRIES, ETC
PERSONAL
PUBLICATIONS, PAPERS, SOCIETIES
PRODUCTION, ETC
CHINA CLAY AND STONE
LIMEKILNS AND LIMESTONE QUARRIES – CORNWALL
SLATE QUARRIES – CORNWALL
OTHER QUARRIES – CORNWALL
DEVON MINES
PERSONAL – DEVON
MINING INDUSTRY – DEVON
CHINA CLAY - BALL CLAY - DEVON
LIMESTONE AND LIMEKILNS - DEVON
SLATE QUARRIES - DEVON
OTHER QUARRIES - DEVON

And overseas.

It’s extremely useful if you are researching certain mines or areas as I find there is nothing worse than ploughing through years of microfiche. Heaven knows how long it took him to compile.

http://www.projects.ex.ac.uk/mhn/Newspaper1.htm
IP: 88.105.181.84
Tin Miner

Joined: 24/06/2007

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 29/12/2007 08:58:22
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Myself and Tricia Browning have supplied many useful references for that data-base of Alasdair's

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If at first you don't succeed feck it or try again
IP: 77.100.64.198
carnkie

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Joined: 07/09/2007
Location: camborne, cornwall

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 29/12/2007 12:46:10
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Well thanks for that because it can save an awful lot of time. Perhaps you can answer a question for me. I was going through the entries for Wheal Basset (The mine being of particular interrest to the history group I'm a member of) and there are many entries in the Plymouth and Devonport Weekly Journal in the first half of the 19th century. As you know this is kept in the Plymouth Local Studies Library. I'm just slightly puzzled why a mine from this area should be mentioned so often in a local Devon newspaper. I'm probably missing the obvious.

Malcolm
IP: 88.105.196.178 Edited: 29/12/2007 13:01:36 by carnkie
Tin Miner

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 29/12/2007 14:44:20
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One of the reasons why so many Cornish Mines were included in the Devon newspapers is because the reports were extracted from the Mining Journals. Or another possibility could be that certain mines had the same management which would help promoting the company's shares further afield. Hope this helps.
Regards Tin Miner

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If at first you don't succeed feck it or try again
IP: 77.100.64.198
carnkie

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Location: camborne, cornwall

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Devon and Cornwall mine data base
Posted: 29/12/2007 15:14:28
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yes, worth thinking about. Cheers. IP: 88.105.183.114
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