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Mine Exploration Forum

Author Shaddering
mcrtchly

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Joined: 30/08/2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland

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Shaddering
Posted: 15/12/2011 11:15:21
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Has anyone come across the term Shaddering as in 'shaddering ore' - also sometimes written as Shaddered. The term seems to be related to ore dressing and the amount of ore affected can be quite large (10 tons or more). Could the term be the same as shammelling (that is moving material from one place to another in a relay using manual labour)?

Shaddering has been noted in the minute books of the Associated Irish Mine Company (Avoca mines, Co. Wicklow, Ireland) from the late C18th (1787 onwards). One of the owners was Charles (and William) Roe who also mined copper in Coniston, Alderley Edge and North Wales (including Parys Mountain). The term Shaddering could come from one of these other mining areas or perhaps from Cornwall where some of the mine managers came from.

Martin
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davetidza

Joined: 21/02/2010

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Shaddering
Posted: 15/12/2011 12:18:04
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They don't appear in Jim Rieuwerts' 'Glossary'. IP: 62.49.28.79
Boy Engineer

Joined: 20/06/2008
Location: Derby

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Shaddering
Posted: 15/12/2011 13:25:16
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There are a number of possible origins. The first relates to the use of a ladder in lieu of normal construction ply shuttering to hold concrete in place. One can see the obvious disadvantage unless extremely low slump gobbo was specified. However, where one needs to cast a narrow box section beam it could be just the ticket.
The second is a description of climbing up (or down) really dodgy ladders in mines, the sort that make one's bowels turn to water, generally uncontrollably. It is a conflation of shat and ladder. I remember an incident in a rise above Capleclough Horse Level where a friend descended at speed (accelerating at 9.81m/s2) when just such a ladder collapsed. Fortunately the wetsuit prevented it becoming a full shaddering experience, but it was a close call.
I'm sure that there are more suitably plausible descriptions out there amongst similarly bored members waiting for home time.
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christwigg

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Joined: 20/02/2008
Location: Cleveland / North Yorkshire

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Shaddering
Posted: 15/12/2011 13:46:54
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I've found one reference to it on Google Books.

A supplement to the glossary of the dialect of Cumberland 1905

Shadder, e. To break up the ' bouse ' and pick out the ore. The larger pieces were shaddered

So perhaps the link to Coniston is the one.
IP: 145.8.104.65 Edited: 15/12/2011 13:48:22 by christwigg
staffordshirechina

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Joined: 15/11/2009
Location: North Staffordshire

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Shaddering
Posted: 15/12/2011 16:27:27
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Perhaps a dialect corruption of 'shattered'? IP: 95.148.24.119
PeteJ

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Joined: 12/05/2008
Location: Frosterley, Durham

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Shaddering
Posted: 15/12/2011 20:32:40
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The Mulcaster MSS 1795 says that

" Shaddered ore: How it got or why it has that name I do not know, but think it would have been more properly denominated hand-picked-ore, for such it is, being what those pieces of the bouse called knockings are, broken into if clean, or if not what is broken off from such....... this ore needs no washing, being picked as above and carried to the bingstead as clean,.....".

The context of this quote is that ore can be divided into shaddered ore, sieve ore, smithorn, and slime ore.

Bulletin of the Historical Metallurgy Group Vol 5, No 2, 1971.

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