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Mine Exploration Forum

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Author Fellows lamps forum.
SimonRL

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Posted: 05/01/2014 22:27:30
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Bumpity! Not had one explode in 7 years Big Grin What's up with it? Drop me a line by PM if you like. IP: 81.129.71.175
Dean Allison

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Posted: 05/01/2014 23:25:15
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Sorry for the drama, I suppose "explode" was an exaggeration. It was not as spectacular as that. It just sort of smoked a lot and then the lights went out. I am going to get the new lamp anyway. That was the original S7 I had from about 2008 or whatever. Probably my dodgy fitting of the replacement LEDs was the fault. Stenlights are ace lamps. IP: 84.13.91.156
Global S

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Posted: 05/03/2014 20:54:34
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Stumbled across the forum when looking for more information about the Trigon as I'm after a new lamp for caving.

Reading all of Roy's posts has certainly reassured me about buying one! Quick question. I notice that the battery box has screws in it. Does this mean that the batteries inside can be changed with decent 18650s when they stop holding charge so much.

Also my Scurion 1500 owning mate has cautioned me about using "cheap" lamps as they can give very tight beams compared to his expensive toy. How does the Trigon compare in this respect?
IP: 109.224.170.59
royfellows

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Posted: 05/03/2014 22:32:38
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Quick question. I notice that the battery box has screws in it. Does this mean that the batteries inside can be changed with decent 18650s when they stop holding charge so much.

Roy> They can be changed but its a return to me to do it and possibly not worth the trouble as most of the cost is in the cells not in the case.
I am now using genuine Sanyo cells which I believe is the same as Scurrion, Nora, and all the other top end lamps.
I am also currently testing a new alternative battery system that will allow a customer to remove 18560 cells for an alternative use or use their own choice cells, or whatever.

Also my Scurion 1500 owning mate has cautioned me about using "cheap" lamps as they can give very tight beams compared to his expensive toy. How does the Trigon compare in this respect?

Roy> Interesting statement as tightish beams are little to do with lamp quality. Some users prefer a tight beam, others prefer a wide one with more overall illumination.
There are beam shots on my lamp website www.ledcaplamps.com
Trigon beam is 1 metre circle at about 7 metres with good spill.
Thinking about it, the trigons 1750 lumens in a tight pencil beam would probably be good for cutting up scpap cars.
Laugh

--

To fully understand something one must first strip away and discard all that is unnecessary.
IP: 78.148.241.229 Edited: 05/03/2014 22:33:46 by royfellows
Global S

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Posted: 05/03/2014 22:47:46
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Thanks for getting back to me Roy. Knowing that you will be releasing a battery box that takes cells I already own is even better.

IP: 109.224.170.59 Edited: 05/03/2014 22:48:19 by Global S
royfellows

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Posted: 06/03/2014 11:30:05
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Yes but the penny finaly dropped about what your Scurrion mate meant. He was obviously refering to mining lamps, that is lamps manufactured for use in working mines. The tight pencil beam is fairly universal, it was the "cheap lamps" bit that put me off, Oldham DL16 isn't really cheap.

--

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royfellows

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Posted: 23/05/2014 09:27:27
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Charging Issues
I have had some battery pack charging issues reported which have been entirely due to dirt in the yellow XT60 lamp connector, or the 4 way multiplug on MagnumStar batteries.
We are all aware of the state that kit gets into with underground use, however the lamp connector is often a neglected item due to the reliability of the yellow connector with its gold plated contacts. These rarely give any trouble lamp wise, which is possibly the reason for neglect. However the electronic chargers are very sensitive to poor connection, this is easily spotted on 8V chargers by connecting up the power pack and observing the behaviour of the built in digital voltmeter before switching on power.
A nonsense series reading such as No1 - 2.1, No 2 - 3.8, ALL - 7.4 indicates a bad connection; a squirt of WD40 now and again will do no harm.
12V lamps charge through a 4 way multiplug, again these can get dirty and affect charging, a squirt of WD40 now and again and observe the behaviour of the voltmeter before switching on mains power. No1 - 1.8, No2 - 3.8, No3 - 7.0, ALL - 11.4 is a nonsense.
The readings for each array should be equal within a small difference of say 0.4 of a volt.
The 4V series (EcoStar and WSP) don’t have a voltmeter so look for erratic behaviour of the LEDs.


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royfellows

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Posted: 23/06/2014 19:53:10
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(click image to open full size image in new window)

In order to address rumours I have to reveal that I have been testing and evaluating a new range of lamps of an innovative bi metal construction, the Lynx.
I will be describing these lamps in detail when evaluations are finished and I have stock to offer. There are two models the X3000 and X5000, the later is a replacement for the MagnumStar which is now discontinued.

There is no intention to cease production of EcoStars or Trigons, the later being appreciably less expensive than the lower level Lynx.
The new lamps are compatible with the existing 8 and 12 volt power packs and chargers.

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IP: 78.151.174.9
Mr Mike

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Posted: 24/06/2014 07:35:57
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Go on then Roy...... spill the beans.... chop chop!

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Mr Mike www.mineexplorer.org.uk
IP: 88.104.9.24
royfellows

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Posted: 24/06/2014 09:34:02
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I'm sorry you will all have to wait, I need to thoroughly test these lamps and assess possible component supply issues etc.
Its no good me winding everyone up on something that’s a non starter.

EDIT
My real concern is a situation where a load of people want one and I have no stock to fill the demand, I am trying to delay until I have stock to sell.

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IP: 2.97.68.237 Edited: 24/06/2014 09:39:15 by royfellows
royfellows

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Posted: 27/06/2014 12:45:45
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Cree XM-L 2 U2
EcoStars and Trigons are now using Cree XM-L 2 U2 emitters (and have been for a while) to provide a new increased output and efficiency.
EcoStar
A new standard mode of 200 lumens for a battery hit of 1.3 watts at nominal voltage puts this low priced efficient and outstandingly reliable lamp into a class of its own. I have had no RMA returns on this lamp at all for 18 months, regardless of increased sales.
Trigon
Standard mode is now also at 200 lumens same as the EcoStar. Previous figures for higher settings are likely however as the XM-L2 output and efficiency is dependant on a temperature of less than 25C. But the use of U2 BINS gives a slightly higher output. 560 lumens for the Eco and a possible 2000 for the Trigon.
Existing customers are not missing anything much.

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IP: 2.97.68.237 Edited: 27/06/2014 13:14:30 by royfellows
royfellows

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Posted: 09/07/2014 14:01:48
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(click image to open full size image in new window)

We are the new Daleks
Dalek technology is supeme
We shall dominate the underworld

Laugh

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IP: 78.151.172.78
Vanoord

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Posted: 09/07/2014 14:06:30
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Wow

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Filling space until a new signature comes along...
IP: 81.139.182.201
SimonRL

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Posted: 09/07/2014 14:07:00
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Can they go up stairs? Wink

They look very nice indeed Roy. Any idea yet when they're going on sale?

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What I do, that will be done to me
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Pinzgauer

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Posted: 09/07/2014 14:07:17
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Good one Roy ! Big GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig Grin

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royfellows

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Posted: 09/07/2014 15:07:31
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The Lynx X_Lamp
To the best of my knowledge the Lynx represents the worlds first bimetal constructed lamp, having a body of aluminium but with double track copper heat conductors.

The lamp is built on lessons gained from experimentation and also upon the design of my pre-existing range of lamps based on Oldham headsets. Main issues with the Oldham conversions are the limitations of the Oldham switch and also space limitations inside the lamp. However the heat conduction system that is build into these lamps performs remarkably well.
There are two versions of this new lamp being produced, one is designed to run off the existing Trigon 8V battery system, the other on the MagnumStar 12V system, however the MagnumStar is now discontinued.
The more important principles embodied in the Lynx are easily summarised.

#1 Regardless or mass or thickness copper conducts heat faster than aluminium, thermal conductivity is a product of the material not of its mass or thickness. The thermal conductivity of copper is about double that of aluminium. A mass of aluminium can absorb a lot of heat, however unless dissipation to ambient is possible heat will continue to build up. In other words, the mass simply enables a stay of execution before thermal shutdown occurs. It is possible to use copper effectively for this purpose without creating unacceptable weight by simply using thinner copper which works just as well.

#2 A caplamp has to be a realistic size and to simply cram as many high power emitters into it as possible like some of the Chinese torches obviously leads to a reduction in the size of the reflectors and a consequent scattering of light, not to mention depletion of the battery.

#3 The most efficient design electronically is achieved by wiring the emitters in series so as to match the input voltage. Parallel wiring to a voltage mismatched random array of battery cells like a lot of Chinese torches and bike lights is a rubbish design, however this is the only way that different emitters can be powered at differing current levels such as mixing say a beam with a flood. The Lynx uses XML-2 U2 emitters wired in series for each array of beams and floods and hits the battery for about 0.7 watts per 100 lumens at walk mode. Remember the Oldham bulb lamps, 50 lumens for 4 watts, ouch.

#4 All of my designs mount LEDs on the front of a copper plate, with driver electronics on the rear. This means that they share the same heat platform and so enable the thermal shutdown control to be in tune with the LEDs. Comparing this to similar lamps, most will mount the LEDs at the back of the lamp with the electronics on the same plane. Obviously this would present problems finding room for arrays set behind reflectors or optics, so there is a necessity for my design method anyway. In relation to the aforementioned mounting it can easily be appreciated that the heat will travel to the back of the lamp, while the heatsink fins are on the circumference of the body. My method takes heat in both directions, directly to the circumference of the lamp, and to the rear via a conductor which doubles as a means of retaining the LED module. The rear of the lamp is in the form of a copper back plate which readily absorbs heat and conducts it to ambient. The lamps can easily be personalised by engraving the name of the owner or whatever on the copper backplate.

#4 An Oldham or similar front glass is secured by a screw on bezel rather than the machine screws favoured by other lamp manufacturers. The bezel is of a thick strong and hefty design which will protect the most vulnerable area of the lamp. Removal of this enables the removal of the LED module attachment screw and the lifting out of the module for service attention when needed. I am not a fan of polycarbonate and feel that glass is best option but needs protection around the circumference.

#5 Helmets are no longer manufactured with brackets. These new lamps follow the current general trend of using a bracket which allows tilt adjustment and is designed to attach directly to the helmet. The bracket holes match exactly the holes of a Petzl lamp bracket so that the items will be interchangeable. I will be making up a few lamp mounting brackets with spade type attachments for helmets with a lamp bracket.

#6 The low battery warning light of the more powerful Oldham head conversions is replaced by LED arrays to indicate battery state, these will give a good indication throughout the discharge range.

#7 The old emergency light is also dumped in favour of a new pilot light which will normally give about 40 lumens or about 25 lumens if the batteries are depleted and electronically disconnected. Being left with no light rather than a gradually dimming one has been the bugbear of higher voltage lamps, this overcomes this by using the residual voltage left in the power pack. All the user does if lamp goes out is flick the beam switch the other way to get pilot. The output is surprisingly bright, I have seen mining lamps hardly much better on beam. The emitter is Cree XPG behind a very clever little optic from Ledil.
The pilot is a very good light and eminently suitable for use in company where even the Walk Mode could cause discomfort to other people.

#8 The main emitters are XML2 U2s with both beams and floods being driven at 3 settings with a maximum of fractionally under 3 amps. Two separate switches allow beams and floods to be used in combination, however when used in this way the floods are limited to a maximum current of 1 amp to keep down the ‘battery hit’ and also to keep the heat generated to within the bounds of the more powerful lamp.
Both lamps are essentially similar inside except that the 8V lamps use 2S emitters, while the 12V lamp uses 3S emitters. Other differences are necessitated by interior space.

The Lynx X5000



(click image to open full size image in new window)

One of my major goals has been to reduce the weight of the MagnumStar which is now discontinued. The Magnumstar weighed a massive 455 grams, the Lynx LX5000 weighs in at about 325 grms.

Just like the MagnumStar the lamp has a separate switch box however this is now reduced in size as the low battery warning system is inside the lamp. The cabling is through a clear silicone tube which is very flexible; I was concerned that pressure could be put on the lamp so as to affect its tilt setting. The switches are of a non corroding type and potted inside the switch box. This design is exceptionally user friendly, which really with a lamp of this power is necessary as the wearer will be doing a lot of flicking between modes. I shall also be looking at feasibility of producing this lamp with integral switches like the X3000.

Internally, the lamp has basically the same components as the MagnumStar with a few changes. Like the MagnumStar it runs on a 12V input, either from a new compact 6 cell 5.2 AH power pack designed to be carried in an inside pocket or the big 10 AH belt pack which was sold with the MagnumStar. Please note that I still produce these.

The emitters are XML2 U2s with both beams and floods being driven at 3 settings with a maximum of fractionally under 3 amps to give a maximum output of about 2900 lumens. The MagnumStars XPG based supplementary floods are dumped, with the XML floods switchable together with the Beams, however when used in this way the floods are limited to a maximum current of 1 amp to give an output of 1500 lumens. This gives the lamp a theoretical maximum of about 4400 lumens.

The beams ‘walk mode’ drives the LEDs at a current of 200 mA to give an impressive 300 lumens. This is possible because the lamps internal temperature remains well below the XML 2 ‘magic temperature limit’ of 25 degrees, at this setting its drawing 2.1 watts at nominal voltage.

The Pilot light (Emergency or Pilot) is at about 40 lumens or 30 lumens if battery flat and electronically disconnected, however tests have confirmed that 12V 3 series Li Ions will come back on line in seconds. Its hits the battery for 120 mA, how many days it would burn for on the 12V battery is something I have yet to work out.

The low battery warning is in the form of 2 bright blue LEDS bright enough to shine on a wall in front of you so need to take helmet off. Both bright is battery good, one dims to eventually go out at battery half way, then the other dims to go out at battery on reserve. They are, in fact on a good battery bright enough to get around with if you are into blue lighting.

With this new lamp I am offering a new compact 12V Li Ion battery designed to fit into an inside pocket inside overalls or an oversuit. This eliminates trailing wires, belt mounted batteries, and even batteries on the helmet. I am using one of these and you just don’t know you have it on you. It utilises high quality high capacity cells and I have found it suitable for all day trips even with some full power usage.



(click image to open full size image in new window)

The Lynx X3000



(click image to open full size image in new window)



(click image to open full size image in new window)

This lamp is similar in performance to the Trigon, it has beams at 200, 650, or 2000 lumens with walk mode of 200 lumens at 1.4 watts at nominal voltage taking advantage of XML2 technology.

The floods are at 100, 650, or 2000 lumens, and can by used in combination with the beams but at a reduced maximum output to spare the battery. The combined max is about 3000 lumens

The lamp operates by two separate toggle switches mounted into the lamp. These are of very high quality, waterproof, and manufactured by a German company. They need no external covers or anything to maintain waterproof integrity.

The Pilot light (Emergency or Pilot) is at 40 lumens or 20 lumens if battery flat and electronically disconnected.

The battery fuel gauge is a strip of four blue LEDs indicating a battery level of 25%,50%,75%, or 100%.



(click image to open full size image in new window)

Weight 280 grams.

This lamp uses the same 8V battery system as the Trigon, which there is no intention to discontinue as long as I can obtain new Oldham headsets. Trigons are also now fitted with XML2 U2 beam emitters and have been for a while.

The old MagnumStar had the advantage of much more flood output than the new lamp, which was very useful for photography. Unfortunately it was a very heavy lamp and very finicky for me to produce. The lighter version of the new lamp does not really do much more than the Trigon except cater for those who like to mix beam and flood. I have to say that middle flood and low beam do provide very pleasing an effect.

The X3000 lamp is £225 with 4 cell sealed power pack, charger, and fitting kit etc.

The X5000 is £260 with the compact ‘six pack’ power pack, plus charger etc.

I can quote lamp only prices for anyone who already has one of my high voltage lamps as the new lamps are fully compatible with the Trigon and MagnumStar system, but these two systems are different voltages so NOT interchangeable.

Unfortunately, I still have some minor issues to resolve before any of these lamps are offered for sale.


--

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IP: 78.151.172.78 Edited: 09/07/2014 15:11:50 by royfellows
ttxela

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Posted: 10/07/2014 20:51:00
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These look fantastic Roy!

I'm still rather attached to my Magnumstar though Smile
IP: 86.151.214.188
ChrisJC

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Posted: 10/07/2014 21:38:06
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Looks good Roy. Do we get a demonstration* at NAMHO this month?

Chris.

*or shootout.
IP: 109.150.200.27
royfellows

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Posted: 10/07/2014 21:52:58
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ttxela wrote:



I'm still rather attached to my Magnumstar though Smile


Understandable
In the words of Shakespeare " All that glitters is not gold"

I have sold my own Maggie to an eager customer who regards them as rather iconic.

There is a general interest point here, well a few actually.

The Oldham conversions are remarkably efficient at getting rid of the heat, the X3000 does it a lot better than a Trigon, but the X5000 is hardly any better than a Maggie, mmm.... possibly about the same. If you look at the heat sink area of the Maggie, taking account of the fact that air can flow virtually both sides, you will see where I am coming from.

The other point is there is a difference in a lamp between the actual weight of it and the perception of the weight by the wearer. The further forward the lamp is mounted on the helmet the greater the perception of the weight, because its exerting a leverage effect on the helmet. Also the Oldham design is exceptionally good in that the angle of the beam is at optimum by design of the lamp, and also again by its design its set as close to the wearers helmet as possible.

The switch is very clever in that there is a contact spring that provides 0V connectivity and doubles as part of the seal mechanism by exerting in inward pressure so that a bezel on the switch spindle bears against a rubber O ring. Technically they should be waterproof to a depth until water pressure equals the spring pressure. Early lamps used a ring of felt.

Clever old lamps, imitated everywhere, and we all know that "imitation is the highest form of flattery"
Big Grin

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IP: 78.151.172.78
royfellows

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Posted: 10/07/2014 21:56:40
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ChrisJC wrote:

Looks good Roy. Do we get a demonstration* at NAMHO this month?

Chris.

*or shootout.


OK we all know that Chris's lamp is more powerful, possibly most powerful in the world. We all know how much Chris spent building it.

Now I wonder what Sigmund Freud would have made of this.

Laugh

EDIT
Chris, I have tried a topic seach on the word "Glowworm" and negative hits. Did you just post about your lamp on ME or on here as well?
Its a remarkable piece of work, and now I have finished taking the 'you know what' I would like to have a re read on it.
MORE EDIT

Its OK, found it on ME and a link to your own web pages on it

--

Qualifications? Well, being doing it for 30 years and I'm still here.
IP: 78.151.172.78 Edited: 10/07/2014 22:21:47 by royfellows
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