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Author Books - Mendip, Glaisdale and Chester
Moorebooks

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Joined: 28/11/2007
Location: Newport, Shropshire

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Books - Mendip, Glaisdale and Chester
Posted: 18/08/2017 14:29:58
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The following available from www.Moorebooks.co.uk and usual outlets

A History of Iron Working at Glaisdale - Simon Chapman, Sb, A5, 65pp - £6.95
Glaisdale can be found south of the Esk and near Whitby situated in the North Yorkshire Moors, the book describes the areas of industry from mines to furnaces and remains that can be found today, it was linked to the Cleveland Railway which help distribute the ore and products.There is a drawing and plan of the Ironworks and pictures of remaining artifacts.

Review Whitby Gazette 21 July - For the first time, a comprehensive history of the working of Ironstone round the Glaisdale area can found in the New Book by Simon Chapman. A History of Glaisdale describes the start of the railway connection between Grosmont and Castleton as well as potential lines linking Glaisdale to East Cleveland.

The impact of speculative attempts at several mines around the valley and the struggle to provide a quantity of reliable Iron Ore to feed the furnaces took its toll , not only on local roads but on Iron Ore Comapanies fortunes. Glaisdale had 3 blast furnaces which in turn brought an influx of work, trade and problems into a previously quiet agricultural place, all of which make for an interesting read.

The up and down turns of the village's fortunes are surprisingly linked to the whole of the Esk valley from Kildale to Grosmont, which is laid out clearly in this publication. Ventures were pitched at the time holding riches beyond imagination but to get the true story of Glaisdale's industrial pat you can get no better than investing in the 65 page book which is illustrated throughout.

An Illustrated History of Chester Leadworks - Geoff Pickard, hb, 216pp 275x215mm. Printed on gloss art paper with colour laminated board covers. £25.00

(publisher review)Chester leadworks is one of the city’s oldest industries. It was established in 1800 on the banks of the Shropshire Union Canal, close to the city centre. From lead shot used by soldiers in the Napoleonic Wars to radiation shielding for nuclear submarines, during its two hundred years’ history the works produced an extensive range of products for many different applications. Operating for many years as a family partnership under the name Walkers, Parker & Co., it eventually became part of Associated Lead Manufacturers Ltd which was one of the largest and most important companies in the UK lead industry. Furnaces were employed to smelt lead ore and other raw material to produce refined lead ingots. These were further processed into finished products which included lead sheet and pipe, red lead, white lead and a whole range of precision castings and other lead fabrications. The products were supplied in large quantities throughout the UK to customers such as battery manufacturers, builders’ merchants, potteries, glassmakers, paint manufacturers, major chemical companies and the Ministry of Defence. At the centre of the site was a tower where lead shot was manufactured using a patented technique that was first pioneered in the late eighteenth century. Now a Grade II listed building, it still stands today as one of the oldest remaining shot towers in the world and a prominent feature on the Chester skyline.

1951 saw the start of a major rebuilding programme which transformed production departments, office accommodation and general amenities across the site. The first signs of this are evident with the large white asbestos-clad warehouse to the left of the shot tower. This replaced one of the 1830 buildings which had been demolished following the end of white lead production. The steelwork frame for another similar structure is in the process of being erected immediately to the left of it. These two new buildings would eventually house the casting, fabrication and chemical plumbing departments which grew rapidly around this time and were eventually set up as a separate company in the 1960s. The Company house was completely renovated and and a collection of other buildings were demolished to make way for a new sheet mill.

From The Mendips to The Sea, An imaginary journey through the Industrial Landscape of North Somerset - Duncan Harpe, Sb. 112pp, 210x148mm. Printed on gloss art paper, perfect bound with laminated covers. £15

Benjamin Moon and his eldest son Joseph undertake an imaginary journey through the industrial landscape of the North Somerset countryside. Father and son lived and worked at the centre of the Somerset Coalfield, where, during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the town of Radstock found itself a focus of growing industrial expansion. Here is a record of that insular Mendip world, a world of pithead winding gear and chimneys, criss-crossing tramway tracks, railway inclines, embankments and bridges, drifts of steam and billows of smoke.

Moorewood Colliery closed in 1932. Nearby in the hamlet of Benter, is the Fire Engine Inn, so named after the fire or steam engines installed to operate the earlier pits. It was referred to as the Colliers Arms in the late 18th century, and was photographed here around 1920 when George and Margaret Derick were the licensees. The building is still there today though no longer an inn. In this view, the colliery lies a short distance away behind it. The proposal by the Bristol & North Somerset Railway in 1865 to build a line down the Nettlebridge Valley would have linked several pits to the mainline system, and given impetus to the industrial development of the area, but it was not to be. A little further down the valley is Tucking Mill, where the Coal Canal is seen here in its twilight years, still just about in water, but now a more picturesque version of a once busy working waterway. The mill, out of sight behind the photographer, was part of the Fullers Earth industry which operated in this area for many years and which made use of the canal at one time before the S&DJR arrived at Midford.

Mike


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droid

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Location: Tamworth

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Books - Mendip, Glaisdale and Chester
Posted: 18/08/2017 21:42:02
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'Perfect bound'.....a misnomer if ever there was one..... IP: 31.185.37.208
Moorebooks

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Joined: 28/11/2007
Location: Newport, Shropshire

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Books - Mendip, Glaisdale and Chester
Posted: 18/08/2017 22:08:48
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droid wrote:

'Perfect bound'.....a misnomer if ever there was one.....


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Mike
IP: 86.24.94.129
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