Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Jump to page << < 1 2 > >>
Author The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Pete K

Avatar of Pete K

Joined: 08/02/2009
Location: The Peak District or Snowdonia

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 01/03/2019 14:55:46
Reply |  Quote
Mine has also arrived. Many thanks Mike. A loyal customer I shall remain.

--

Not seen the sun for months. Now evolving to see in the dark.
IP: 95.144.11.201
ChrisJC

Avatar of ChrisJC

Joined: 13/10/2007
Location: Northants

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 01/03/2019 19:01:28
Reply |  Quote
Mine too! A nice surprise as I rather like Trevor Ford publications.

Chris.
IP: 94.126.234.198
Moorebooks

Avatar of Moorebooks

Joined: 28/11/2007
Location: Newport, Shropshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 01/03/2019 20:05:40
Reply |  Quote
Thank you Ian, Pete, Chris for your comments re the Blue John Book if any of you could manage a review on that on the caving forum would be great . I'm banned from doing anything like that unless I pay £20 a month

Mike
IP: 77.100.235.46
Peter Burgess

Joined: 01/07/2008
Location: Merstham. Or is it Godstone ...... ?

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 02/03/2019 06:58:54
Reply |  Quote
I am happy to put a review up on Darknessbelow.co.uk at no cost, please get in touch whoever wants to write one. We have a rather different ethos to getting interesting information out to cavers and mine-explorers and have no problem supporting those who try to make a modest living out of their interest.
IP: 91.125.227.252
ttxela

Avatar of ttxela

Joined: 04/09/2007
Location: Cambs

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 02/03/2019 14:50:17
Reply |  Quote
Got mine the other day too, not had much of a chance to look at it yet but looking forward to having a read later Thumb Up IP: 86.138.169.121
derrick man

Joined: 02/01/2014

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 02/03/2019 17:16:46
Reply |  Quote
ttxela wrote:

I'm definitely going to order a copy, however......

Moorebooks wrote:


Every county in England has a network of mine and quarry workings, a little-seen underground world that is full of mystery and complexity.


I think I recall a topic on this subject before, Cambridgeshire I think is almost devoid of underground workings, I am aware of one accessible site with short tunnels in chalk and I believe coprolites may have been dug from shafts,around Barrington but as far as i can tell no trace remains.



Cambridgeshire once had extensive open-cast coprolite workings, starting at Coldhams Lane in Cambridge and extending out towards Lode and Burwell.

The most prominent remains are Coldhams Common - the hummocks are the remains of trench-pattern open-cast mining, the chalk mound known as the Rifle Butts is spoil from the workings, and the bungalow named the Count House adjacent to the railway bridge is the only surviving structure.
IP: 81.96.123.121
AR

Avatar of AR

Joined: 07/11/2007
Location: Knot far from Knotlow in the middle of the Peak District

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 02/03/2019 20:28:03
Reply |  Quote
Some more info on coprolite mining - https://pdmhs.co.uk/MiningHistory/Bulletin%2014-5%20-%20The%20Origins%20and%20Development%20of%20the%20British%20Coprolite%20Industry.pdf

--

Follow the horses, Johnny my laddie, follow the horses canny lad-oh!
IP: 80.247.27.97
Moorebooks

Avatar of Moorebooks

Joined: 28/11/2007
Location: Newport, Shropshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 03/03/2019 08:20:38
Reply |  Quote
TTxela

Having strayed off the original subject - according to the Guide to the IA of Cambridgeshire & Peterborough £5.50 - there is a surviving Coprolite extraction ditch which is Stow-cum Quay which is a nature reserve. Also it mentions limestone mining and surviving limekilns. Of course there is also cement production

I also have a copy of The Cambridgeshire Coprolite Mining Rush by Richard Grove £7

Mike

IP: 77.100.235.46 Edited: 03/03/2019 08:22:00 by Moorebooks
ttxela

Avatar of ttxela

Joined: 04/09/2007
Location: Cambs

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
The Archaeology of Underground Mines and Quarries
Posted: 04/03/2019 08:18:39
Reply |  Quote
Ah, yes. Cambridgeshire certainly has/had lots of surface workings, there is still a great deal of quarrying for gravel going on very close to our house - but I'm still only aware of the two sites where there were underground workings and only one of those is still accessible (although it does consist of several tunnels). IP: 195.171.131.2
Jump to page << < 1 2 > >>
Safety LED Miners Caplamps Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page