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Mine Exploration Forum

Author Rampgill Level
PeteJ

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Joined: 12/05/2008
Location: Frosterley, Durham

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 29/09/2018 17:17:00
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Any suggestions for what may have caused the spike in zinc content?



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Pete Jackson Frosterley 01388527532
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caver1

Joined: 28/02/2016

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 29/09/2018 17:45:02
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The graph shows zinc in solution at 3 locations over time. I suspect the late spring / early summer spike would be due to low water levels / drought conditions. What water there was spent longer in contact with the ore minerals before running past the test stations. In normal, wetter, conditions the water has less time to dissolve metals, has less carbonic acid content from soils and CO2 solution, and is more diluted.

Do you have a rainfall graph, or a flow graph, for the same location(s)?

My guess for now until something better comes along... Big Grin
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christwigg

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 29/09/2018 20:46:40
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Probably needs to be some sort of calculation of the flow/volume coming out to understand if the spike is significant.

Could be exactly the same total amount, just with less dilution due to the drought.

IP: 2.122.23.177 Edited: 29/09/2018 20:51:40 by christwigg
gNick

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 01/10/2018 15:29:56
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I wonder how this might be affected by people stirring up the sediments, particularly the deep water sections in Hangingshaw?

If the zinc sampling is a single sample every few months, the spikes may just represent a single event that has little bearing on the contamination as a whole.

Without the flow rates the graph has even less meaning.

If the spikes represent high concentration due to a low water flow you might expect corresponding inverted spikes due to high water flow which seem not to be present.



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sparty_lea

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 01/10/2018 19:01:12
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Samples only seem to be taken every couple of months so not really enough information there to say if its a one off event like bunch of explorers digging up some silt or something giving a more persistant change like drought or changed water flows in the mine.

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PeteJ

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 02/10/2018 20:06:56
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Thanks for your thoughts. The question was posed by the EA team.
I will ask them for comparable data about water flow.

Rainfall after November 2017 appeared to be well below the average and still appears to be low.

I also heard a report in the spring of 2018 that the water in Rampgill Level had been discoloured for several days - whitish-grey was the description. Nobody has reported a roof fall or a washout of a weir. Any comments? - can be sent to me via PM if thought to be sensitive.....

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royfellows

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Joined: 13/06/2007
Location: Great Wyrley near Walsall

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 02/10/2018 21:34:58
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Water levels are good news as I will be up later in the month and want to do my fish trip now its possible again. I fully expect some 'fun' in the shale level though.

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PeteJ

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Rampgill Level
Posted: 02/10/2018 21:40:59
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Caplecleugh level is always wet! IP: 146.198.100.94
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