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Author Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Cornish Pixie

Avatar of Cornish Pixie

Joined: 02/01/2009
Location: Wicklow, Ireland

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 08/12/2009 14:24:26
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Yes, Penhalurick and Penaluna are both Cornish language surnames! It's interesting to try and trace such names outside Cornwall, as this provides some intriguing avenues for researching previous migration networks. I did a fair bit of such research looking for mining migration chains using online white pages worldwide looking for Cornish language surname clusters. I also used this website which proved very useful: http://www.publicprofiler.org/worldnames/

Entering the Cornish language surname Penhalurick into this database (which means something like 'top of cultivated ground on the moor', interesting, as the name is very prevalent in the C19th in the Stithians area of Cornwall which is on moorland), shows that it has its highest density in Wales. Intriguing to speculate that this might be a manifestation of migration from one industrial area to another in the C18th and C19th. As if to confirm your observation Plodger, the name also has a strong showing in N.E. England.

--

Den heb davaz a gollaz i dir
IP: 89.204.194.163 Edited: 08/12/2009 14:25:09 by Cornish Pixie
Bearpark

Joined: 03/06/2009

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 14/12/2009 21:01:00
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this subject is still very important as the social upheaval at the time with the fight against the bond, the evictions and the reduction in wages.The immigration into the Durham and Northumberland Coalfield whether as potential strikebreakers or economic migrants was not only relevant to Cornwall but for the family background makeup of the present gererations. My greatgrandparents on my dad's side were from Coleraine (protestant) and Ayeshire, while on my mother's side were from Listowell (Prynne) and Fife a mixed bag if ever there was one. IP: 91.125.15.131
Bearpark

Joined: 03/06/2009

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 14/12/2009 21:17:44
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The South Moor witherite deposit was discovered in the workings of the Morrison Pit (formerly Holmside and South Moor Collieries Ltd) in 1931 when a drift was made from the Hutton Seam engine plane to prospect a faulted area and reached the deposit 2miles south of the then Morrison North Pit. The vein (not seam) was developed over 2,500ft. There is the rest of the information in Geology of the Northern Pennine Orefield by Dunham. These collieries including Craghead, South Moor, Ushaw Moor, New Brancepeth were all on the edge of the orefield and the Witherite and Barytes deposits were all found mostly as oreshoots along promonent faultlines. IP: 91.125.15.131
Bearpark

Joined: 03/06/2009

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 15/12/2009 13:16:54
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I better get in quick, a senile moment, Oops obviously Listowel is in County Kerry not Cornwall, I meant Liskeard

IP: 91.125.15.131
Goldie

Joined: 22/05/2018

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 22/05/2018 09:59:02
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Just come across this thread and I hope you might be able to answer a question for me. How were Cornish miners were recruited by other mine companies and how did they travel? My great grandfather migrated from Gwennap to the Barrow in Furness area. He met his wife there who came from Ireland via Paisley. They then moved to South Wales and back to Cornwall. IP: 86.175.221.87
Goldie

Joined: 22/05/2018

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 22/05/2018 10:12:43
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Just come across this thread and I hope you might be able to answer a question for me. How were Cornish miners recruited by other mine companies and how did they travel? My great grandfather migrated from Gwennap to the Barrow in Furness area. He met his wife there who came from Ireland via Paisley. They then moved to South Wales and back to Cornwall. IP: 86.175.221.87
Chalcocite

Joined: 02/07/2017

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Tin miners emigration to Northumberland
Posted: 22/05/2018 15:11:43
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It's easy for cornish miners to be recruited all around the world because they were simply the best at what they did. Their reputations were honed from the hard granite rocks and their reputations spread right around the world. Cornish men one and all.

As for fellows with the surname Penhalaurick I once knew Roger in the RIC County Museum. He was a Welshman but his descendants were cornish. Smile
IP: 213.205.194.13
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