Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Author Ty Isaf/Cae Conroy and Llanerchyraur
Baloo

Joined: 09/09/2017

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Ty Isaf/Cae Conroy and Llanerchyraur
Posted: 09/09/2017 15:01:44
Reply |  Quote
Where can I find site plans and historical photos of these mines? IP: 94.9.66.206
rufenig

Avatar of rufenig

Joined: 18/03/2008
Location: Shropshire Hills

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Ty Isaf/Cae Conroy and Llanerchyraur
Posted: 09/09/2017 17:20:25
Reply |  Quote
There is some information here.

" The Old Metal Mines of Mid-Wales" part 4
David E. Bick

Which you can get here.
http://www.moorebooks.co.uk/-USED-The-Old-Metal-Mines-of-Mid-Wales-Part-4-West-Montgomeryshire.html
(Other book sellers are available.)
I don't know of more extensive records, but others might.
IP: 31.185.250.3
Baloo

Joined: 09/09/2017

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Ty Isaf/Cae Conroy and Llanerchyraur
Posted: 09/09/2017 19:48:03
Reply |  Quote
Thanks, I have that book and it gives good detail. There surely would have been site plans or sketches or original photos stored somewhere in an archive. Do you know where I should look? IP: 94.9.66.206
rufenig

Avatar of rufenig

Joined: 18/03/2008
Location: Shropshire Hills

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Ty Isaf/Cae Conroy and Llanerchyraur
Posted: 09/09/2017 20:59:08
Reply |  Quote
Records often do not survive or get archived for metal mines.

I suppose the place to look will be the National Library in Aber. Finding anything may well mean trolling through the archive of "Mining Journal" .
Let's see if anyone else has ideas.
IP: 31.185.250.3
Graigfawr

Joined: 04/11/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Ty Isaf/Cae Conroy and Llanerchyraur
Posted: 11/09/2017 23:34:06
Reply |  Quote
Welsh metal mine underground plans are held by:

(1) county archives, having either been deposited as part of estate collections, or having been distributed from the former Mining Record Office (central government collection of mining plans) which comprised abandonment plans deposited with H.M. Inspectors of Mines in accordance with 1872 Mines Act, and copies working plans voluntarily deposited in mid C19 when the MRO was initially established.

(2) British Geological Survey at Nottingham - quite a lot of their plans are copies of estate or abandonment plans, etc held by other archives, made by geological survey staff and can be rather rough and sketchy.

(3) in a few cases, by the National Library of Wales, having been deposited as part of estate collections before the network of Welsh county archives were established.

Many smaller mines were exempt from a legal obligation of depositing plans on account of their small workforce placing them beneath the threshold laid down by 1872 Mines Act.

Many metal mining companies went bankrupt or faded away and failed to deposit abandonment plans.

Surface maps are available for all Welsh metal mining sites:

The Ordnance Survey surveyed all of Wales at 1:2,500 scale (about 25 inches to a mile) apart from the highest hills (where many mines are located) which were surveyed at 1:10,560 scale (six inches to a mile). The National Library of Scotland website lists sheet numbers with survey dates and publication dates for all published sheets. Broadly, central Wales was surveyed for the first time at these scales around the 1880s, and revised around the 1900s. These two dates usefully caught many mines near the end of their working lives. A good range of sheets are available as scans on the NLS website. but there are many gaps in their Welsh coverage. County archives and NLW between them hold most sheets enabling coverage of gaps in what is available on the NLS website.

The four Welsh archaeological trusts (Clwyd-Powys, Dyfed, Glamorgan-Gwent, and Gwynedd) and the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments in Wales, based in Abersytwyth, have made records of the surface remains of many Welsh metal mine sites, varying from sketch maps or marked-up OS 1:2,500 maps, to detailed surveys.

A few Welsh metal mine sites have been surveyed on surface and published in archaeological journals and mining history journals. The two most useful to check are the British Mining series published by the Northern Mine Research Society, and Archaeology in Wales, which is published annually.

Most smaller Welsh metal mines seem never to have been photographed when they were still working; there are at least a few photos of most larger mines from when they were working. Surviving historic photos are mostly in the collections of county archives, public libraries, RCAHMW, NLW, and the National Museum of Wales; others are in private collections.

Most historic photos of Welsh metal mines from when they were working have been published in various books and journal articles over the last 40 years.

Many industrial historians and mining enthusiasts, and the various archaeological organisations mentioned above have photographed virtually all Welsh mine sites over the last 50 years. There is extensive coverage held by the four WATs, RCAHMW and NMW, and also in private collections.

Larger mines have been photographed much more than smaller mines.

Hope these notes are useful!
IP: 176.27.91.235
Safety LED Miners Caplamps Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page