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Author Mining term: Bouse
Aldahar

Joined: 11/09/2017

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 14:13:54
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Anyone know the origin of the word "bouse"? I see "teem" spelled as "team" on your site. I went to Slit mine site yesterday and had a fantastic walk - I'd love to know where some of the mining terms come from! Aldahar IP: 86.170.247.128
Digit

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 14:28:53
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Aldahar wrote:

Anyone know the origin of the word "bouse"? I see "teem" spelled as "team" on your site. I went to Slit mine site yesterday and had a fantastic walk - I'd love to know where some of the mining terms come from! Aldahar


There is a dictionary on site:-
https://www.aditnow.co.uk/dictionary/mining-dictionary.aspx

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sinker

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 14:31:21
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Aldahar wrote:



Anyone know the origin of the word "bouse"?



Doesn't it mean "to wind" as in wind up, raise, lift, haul etc? Up a shaft or incline?

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Ah, well, now, you see.... IP: 82.132.227.86
Jim MacPherson

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 14:43:40
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On a similar subject is there a clear distinction between a bouseteam and a bingstead beyond probably a bingstead held somewhat more processed materials.

Compared to the infantile posturing of Mr Kim and Mr Trump this mattersLaugh
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sinker

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 15:30:05
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Ok I just Googled it and apparently, in Urban Slang it also means:


to be "Incredible"

or to be "#1"

or to be "The best"

or indeed to be "Sick wit' it"


I sometimes feel that life is passing me by..... Sad







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legendrider

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 17:34:43
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There are Old Norse words "boose" meaning: box, division or partition (eg in a cowshed,) and "teem" to pour, spill, empty or unload. 'Bouse' has fallen out of modern use but seems to have retained its sense of division or compartmentalisation in mining lore and been applied to the parcels of mined ore. 'Teem' still retains much of its meaning today, and is used to mean 'swarming' (teeming with life) or 'raining heavily' (teeming down)

Linking the two words as 'bouse teem' gives us 'unloading partition' or 'tipping division'

Smartass

MARK

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Jim MacPherson

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 17:49:57
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That's very erudite legendrider, I did think norse may be there somewhere but I haven't got your forensic focus, presumably 'bingstead' could be norse for a stored measure(s).

But being pretenaturally dumb I am still not too sure that the two terms are different in respect of what is found on the ground, or is it the perfidious albannach trying to sow confusion with the sassenach.

Jim

PS I wonder if Booze in Arkengarthdale has the same derivation.
IP: 146.90.109.129 Edited: 11/09/2017 17:53:48 by Jim MacPherson
legendrider

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 18:27:25
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I'd suggest Booze has the same etymological root, Arkengarthdale is just dripping with Norse (ever been to Gunnar's Saetr?). Despite having no pub, Booze was probably a Norse settlement with a state-of-the-art cow shed.

Farmsteads in our fair district can still be found of the Norse long-house design; house and farm buildings together in a connected row, now regrettably obsolescent with the advent of the wriggly tin/asbestos shed, but still built to a pre-mediaeval design as late as the 1800's

Interesting too how the language of the landscape changes north of Teesdale. Beck and Fell replaced by Burn and Law as more northerly influences prevail. People move and forget but place-names and boundaries persist.

The DNA of our nation is writ large on the map!

MARK







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Jim MacPherson

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 18:42:51
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I had a conversation with Yorkshireman about Windegg, the ever sensible Mike Gill suggested that "gg" in norse is soft sound and it means Windy Edge, how prosaic!

PS re. maps, apparently cartographers have been known to play fast and loose with spellings, who would have thunk itShocked
IP: 146.90.109.129 Edited: 11/09/2017 18:53:44 by Jim MacPherson
sparlad

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 11/09/2017 21:21:48
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I've had a great interest in the origins of our place names since I was still at school and first started reading maps. As for the Teesdale/Weardale watershed, all streams draining south into the Tees are becks, except for Eggleston Burn and all draining north into the wear are Burns, apart from a few round Hamsterley which have tautological names such as Bedburn Beck and Linburn Beck. There are still plenty of fells north of the Tees. They extend as far north as southern Scotland but tend to be less common the further north you go. As for bouse and bing, my understanding is that bouse is run-of-mine ore prior to processing and bing (also a measure of weight) is stored ore, possibly waiting to be transported to the smelter. IP: 86.142.73.207
D.Send

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 14/09/2017 14:49:56
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Hi,
'Bouse' is also a common Norman word of celtic origin meaning ruminant dung, widely used to build wattle and daub walls.
Such walls were widely used for refractory ovens by bakeries and suchlike. The dung acted as a liant, preventing the moulded clay walls from falling to pieces when heated.
'Bouse' had deriveded from 'BOS', pre-latin word meaning cattle, pronounced 'Bows'.
I am not familiar with the term related to mining... in what context is it used?
D.Send.
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Jim MacPherson

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 14/09/2017 16:48:39
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sparlad wrote:

I've had a great interest in the origins of our place names since I was still at school and first started reading maps. As for the Teesdale/Weardale watershed, all streams draining south into the Tees are becks, except for Eggleston Burn and all draining north into the wear are Burns, apart from a few round Hamsterley which have tautological names such as Bedburn Beck and Linburn Beck. There are still plenty of fells north of the Tees. They extend as far north as southern Scotland but tend to be less common the further north you go. As for bouse and bing, my understanding is that bouse is run-of-mine ore prior to processing and bing (also a measure of weight) is stored ore, possibly waiting to be transported to the smelter.


I think fell is linked to the norse word fjall and val (e.g Conival), in many of the hills and and mountains in the highlands and islands, is presumably an albannach adaption of the word, or modified by an english speaking cartographer!, so perhaps law might be a pictish anomaly with possibly the same root at the lows of the PeakConfused

Jim
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AR

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 14/09/2017 21:25:58
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Low and Law both come from Old English "Hlaew" meaning burial mound, also seen in areas settled by Norsemen as Howe, derived from the old Norse equivalent word "Haugr".

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legendrider

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 15/09/2017 08:17:08
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D.Send wrote:

Hi,
'Bouse' is also a common Norman word of celtic origin meaning ruminant dung, widely used to build wattle and daub walls.
Such walls were widely used for refractory ovens by bakeries and suchlike. The dung acted as a liant, preventing the moulded clay walls from falling to pieces when heated.
'Bouse' had deriveded from 'BOS', pre-latin word meaning cattle, pronounced 'Bows'.
I am not familiar with the term related to mining... in what context is it used?
D.Send.


Dung for wattle walls certainly ties in (coincidentally?) with the sense of division or partition.

"Bouse" in the mining sense is the run-of-mine ore which was usually tipped into a row of bunkers (teems/teams) , typically from an overhead tramway.

MARK

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Yorkshireman

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 18/09/2017 08:36:26
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Just a guess, but couldn’t the root of "bouse" be more likely to come from the German "bau" as used in "Abbau", i.e what is mined, winnings (des Abbaus = pertaining to what is mined).

Many of the very early ore miners are assumed to have come from the Harz mountains or other historic orefields in Europe.

Cheers
Y-Man
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D.Send

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 18/09/2017 09:00:41
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Hi Y-man,
Yes, in french we also have the common word 'boue', which means mud, muck or sludge, first recorded 'boe' (11th C), itself derivated from the gaulois 'bau'. The plural of boue is boues...

An 'éboueur' is still a man that shovels boue...

In norman dialect, a 'bouseu' is a mucky person.

Regards,
D.Send.
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John Lawson

Joined: 09/12/2010
Location: Castle Douglas Dumfries & Galloway

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 18/09/2017 19:34:29
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Aldahar,
Asked what was meant by Bouse, this has been answered by legend rider, quite correctly as run of mine ore.
It would be marked up in the mine, from the ore shoot, then trimmed out in a tub, then deposited in the partnership's house team.
This was a a semicircular walled structure, and would accommodate all a partnerships Bouse. The ore being tipped into it from above. As each partnership needed a separate place to dump their ore, these semicircular structures were connected to each, in a line. This group was then called a house team.
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Yorkshireman

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 19/09/2017 08:36:04
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Sorry John,
that’s not quite right.

Quote from Aldahar’s post:

"Anyone know the "origin" of the word "bouse"?"

That's what the various suggestions have been about, not what bouse is, which was, as you mentioned, perfectly explained by legend rider.

The etymology of mining terms is a fascinating subject that also helps us to discover more of the history of mining in a broader linguistic and regional context. It also shines a light on the movement of segments of the population from across Europe in their search for employment - either hired as experts by mine owners or as an escape from poverty in their own countries.

Y-Man
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legendrider

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 19/09/2017 12:08:11
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I did offer a possible origin of the word in an earlier post (Old Norse compartmenty-boxy-divisiony thing).

I don't favour the French or Germanic roots (Boue-, Bau-) simply because of the pairing of 2 Old Norse words to get 'Bouse Team'. Linguistically, blood IS thicker than water!

MARK





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legendrider

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Mining term: Bouse
Posted: 19/09/2017 12:16:27
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sparlad wrote:

tautological names such as Bedburn Beck and Linburn Beck.


If I may labour your point, Colin, another example, Pendle Hill, pretty much means Hill-Hill-Hill Roll Eyes

MARK

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festina lente IP: 86.178.134.94
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