Mine exploration, photographs and mining history for mine explorers, industrial archaeologists, researchers and historians Mine explorer and mining history videos on YouTube Connect with other mine explorers on Facebook
Tip: do not include 'mine' or 'quarry', search by name e.g. 'cwmorthin', use 'Sounds like search' if unsure of spelling

Advanced Search
'Sounds like search'
Quick a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search
Tip: narrow down your search by typing more than one word and selecting 'Search for all words' or 'Exact search'

Search for any word
Search for all words
Exact search

Mine Exploration Forum

Author Pumping water from deep mines
Hattlebags

Joined: 19/01/2014
Location: The Lake District

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 08:19:56
Reply |  Quote
Can anyone here help me understand how the pumps used in the 19th C to lift water out of Deep mines worked ? In the Coniston Coppermines water had to be pumped up well over 1,000ft. I can understand how the water wheel created a horizontal stroke, which was converted to a vertical stroke of around 6 feet, by which pump rods were lifted and dropped. But how was that motion used to lift water up such heights ?
https://flic.kr/p/TDtaaG
IP: 86.151.202.126 Edited: 16/04/2017 09:02:00 by Hattlebags
J25GTi

Joined: 09/06/2012

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 09:27:19
Reply |  Quote
Buy RJ Stewarts new book and all shall be explained.....! IP: 81.155.155.108
sinker

Avatar of sinker

Joined: 13/12/2010
Location: North Wales.

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 09:54:21
Reply |  Quote
Imagine lifting columns of water in a sealed pipe in stages. Each stroke of the pump lifts the water a little higher. Depending on the hydraulics of the system and the height of the lifts you may then need non-return valves in the in the pipework....Wink
Hydraulics defeated me in college and pump design is even worse!

--

Ah, well, now, you see.... IP: 31.48.87.32
Knocker

Joined: 17/06/2008

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 14:36:23
Reply |  Quote
They were basically positive displacement pumps, if you imagine a bucket of water with a pistonm the size of the buckiet in it, with a pipeline coming off of it, going up, push the piston down, the water goes up the, the pipe had clack valves in it (non return valves) which were basically a hinged flap, when the piston, pushed the water up the pipe, the clack valves lifted up with the water, on the return stroke, the clack valve sat back down, stopping the water going back down the pipe and the process repeated with each stroke.
IP: 31.221.88.90
Mr.C

Avatar of Mr.C

Joined: 23/03/2008
Location: North Staffordshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 14:39:17
Reply |  Quote
There's a diagramatic discription in Peels 1893 Coal Mining.
I'll try and post a copy later today

--

We inhabit an island made of coal, surrounded by a sea full of fish. How can we go wrong.......
IP: 95.145.206.20
Graigfawr

Joined: 04/11/2009

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 20:59:32
Reply |  Quote
Two kinds of pumps were used, generally in conjunction:

The lowest set was usually a bucket lift. A wrought iron rod worked inside the column of cast iron pipes. At the lower end of the rod were two semi-circular hinged flaps. On the downward stroke, into the water in the pipe, these opened, allowing water past them. At the lower end of the stroke, they fell shut, and on the upward stroke they lifted the water inside the pipe. Bucket lifts were preferred for the lowest set because they could cope with a certain amount of mud and debris without getting clogged. There would be a perforated strainer at the bottom of the pipes, but some mud debris always got past the strainer. At the top of the pipes was a large wooden box called a cistern which could hold the water lifted by a number of strokes of the pump.

At intervals in the pipes were hinged non-return valves called clack valves which stopped the water flowing back downwards.

The cistern was pumped by a forcing lift of pumps. At the bottom of the pipes entering the cistern was a large H-shaped cast pipe. One of the vertical uprights of the 'H' formed the bottom of the column of pipes in the shaft. A rod (wood or cast iron) worked a hollow casting up and down in the other vertical leg of the 'H', forcing water through the horizontal leg of the 'H' and into the column of pipes where it displaced the water already in the pipe further upwards. Clack valves prevented the water flowing back down. Forcing lifts were fine where there was little or no mud or debris, and so were used in the second and subsequent lifts.

Each lift could be 150 to 200 ft high. Each lift had a cistern at the top with another forcing lift working into it. At the very top, the pipes would discharge into a wooden box-shaped launder (channel) which directed the water into a horizontal tunnel leading to surface, the floor of which was inclined very gently towards the entrance, preventing the the water from flowing back to the shaft.

One pump rod usually ran the depth of the shaft, with offsets to work each lift. The weight of the rods was counterbalanced on surface by balance boxes attached to a second crank on the opposite side of the waterwheel to the main rod.

Motion of the rod was changed from horizontal (from water wheel, along ground at surface) to vertical (where it entered the shaft), and around any changes of inclination in the shaft, by angle bobs.

Many mining instruction books of the C19 cover the subject in detail. One with excellent engravings of pumps in shafts is J.Taylor "On pumps used in mines", Records of Mining, vol.1, London, 1829, pp.125-139 (facsimile reprint by Mining facsimiles, Sheffield, 1986.
IP: 176.24.114.185
Mr.C

Avatar of Mr.C

Joined: 23/03/2008
Location: North Staffordshire

View Profile
View Posts
View Personal Album
View Personal Files
View all Photos
Send Private Message
Pumping water from deep mines
Posted: 16/04/2017 22:16:51
Reply |  Quote
Mr.C wrote:

There's a diagramatic discription in Peels 1893 Coal Mining.
I'll try and post a copy later today

As promised, scanned & uploaded a PDF copy of the relevant pages.
Titled "Cornish pump arrangement" in the documents section.
Enjoy.

--

We inhabit an island made of coal, surrounded by a sea full of fish. How can we go wrong.......
IP: 95.145.206.20 Edited: 16/04/2017 22:20:36 by Mr.C
Safety LED Miners Caplamps Moore Books: Specialist Books I.A. Recordings: Mining and Industrial History DVDs Starless River - Caving Store Explore a Disused Welsh Slate Mine
Disclaimer: Mine exploring can be quite dangerous, but then again it can be alright, it all depends on the weather. Please read the proper disclaimer.
© 2005 to 2015 AditNow.co.uk
Top of Page